People and Process in Social Security

By Karl De Schweinitz; American Council on Education Committee on Education and Social Security | Go to book overview

10. IN-SERVICE TRAINING

Whether we emphasize the elimination of evil or the establishment of a positive good as the objective of the cause, it seems to be true that once the elimination of the evil is accomplished, once the new positive good is established, interest in it is likely to slacken. The momentum of the cause will never carry over adequately to the subsequent task of making its fruits permanent. The slow methodical organized effort needed to make enduring the achievement of the cause calls for different motives, different skill, different machinery. At the moment of its success, the cause tends to transfer its interest and its responsibility to an administrative unit whose responsibility becomes a function of well-organized community life.

-- PORTER R. LEE1

ROUNDING OUT the measures through which the personnel of social security prepare themselves for their work is in-service training. In-service training is the system of instruction which an organization addresses to the individual who comes new to its activities or who begins a new assignment, and which then extends to cover the continuing needs of all the personnel for information and applied skill, merging ultimately with the administrative processes so that the boundary between what is training and what is administration disappears.

Although in-service training is concerned with teaching and learning, its purpose and its approach to the individual are different from those of education in college and university. Professional education, which would seem most closely to resemble in-service training, actually points toward an

____________________
1
Porter R. Lee, Social Work as Cause and Function ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1937), p. 4.

-141-

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