The Jacobins: An Essay in the New History

By Clarence Crane Brinton | Go to book overview

PREFATORY NOTE

This study was made possible largely through a fellowship from the Social Science Research Council. The author wishes to thank that body, as well as the many archivists and librarians in France who have aided in this work. He is particularly indebted to M. Albert Mathiez, whose knowledge and willingness to help extend to the minutest details of revolutionary history; to M. Pierre Caron; and to M. Michel Lhéritier. In America he is especially grateful to Professor A. M. Schlesinger for his continued interest in a subject not properly his own, to Professor E. S. Mason and Dr. S. E. Harris, economists not in the least responsible for the gaps in the author's knowledge of economics, and to Professor Penfield Roberts, who has aided in the work from the beginning. Some of the material incorporated in this book has appeared in the American Historical Review and in the Political Science Quarterly. The author thanks the editors of these reviews for permission to use this material.

CRANE BRINTON

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS, November, 1930.

-vii-

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The Jacobins: An Essay in the New History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I Introduction 1
  • Chapter II Organization 10
  • Chapter III Membership 46
  • Chapter IV Tactics 73
  • Chapter V Platform 137
  • Chapter VI Ritual 184
  • Chapter VII Faith 203
  • Notes 243
  • Appendices 279
  • Index 313
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