PREFACE
THIS book is an altered and considerably shortened version of a thesis of the same title which was submitted for the Doctorate in Philosophy in the University of London. The alterations necessary in fitting the manuscript for publication have resulted in the fact that some points (not all of central importance) do not receive as much emphasis, or substantiation, as I would have liked; and on one or two of these points I would like to make a few observations.
1. Swings of fashion, and indulgence in heated and often superficial polemics, are as common (and harmful) in academic thought, as in most other areas of human experience. The literature embodying the study of human motivation during the past five decades is an extremely good example of this. Originally, I went to some lengths to demonstrate that--underlying the apparent disagreement between the various systems of explanation based upon the concepts of 'instinct', 'need', 'drive', 'reflex' and 'chain-reflex'--there was, in fact, fundamental agreement about the elements of human experience and behaviour involved; and that this basic agreement had been hidden or vitiated by the polemical defence of extremes. Here, I can only assert that this is so. The reader can, however, test this assertion for himself, by studying, say, the work of McDougall, Lewin, Allport, and Watson--taking care to dig beneath the concepts used, to the interrelated facts of physiology, experience, and behaviour, to which they refer. Similarly--to mention a closely related problem--many critics have claimed that great disagreement exists between the lists of instincts, or basic motives, presented by various psychologists. This is a curious and astonishing claim. For if care is taken to keep in mind the mode of classification employed by each psychologist, these lists can be seen to manifest a far greater degree of agreement than of disagreement. This, again, the reader can test, by gathering together several of the lists of basic motives and systematically comparing them.
2. Though I have attempted to vindicate the views of many of the older psychologists--such as William James, Lloyd Morgan, L. T. Hobhouse, James Drever, and others--I am not satisfied that I have emphasised the value of their work as much as it deserves. I am among those who believe that the line between science and philosophy has been too sharply and naïvely drawn during recent decades, and that-- in the study of psychology and sociology in particular--philosophical competence is highly desirable, indeed essential. Most of the earlier psychologists mentioned in Part (1) were possessed of a sound

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Instinct in Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.