1
Introduction

The literature on the political economy of growth is immense: both political scientists and economists have written extensively on this topic. In this paper we do not even attempt to provide a comprehensive survey of the literature; our more modest purpose is to evaluate what we have learnt from the recent outburst of research on the political economy of growth that has occurred in the last few years. This recent literature has developed at the intersection of the new 'endogenous growth theory' and the new 'macro-political economy'.

What is new about these two areas of research? In the growth literature the novelty is in the attempt to view economic growth as an endogenous variable influenced by several factors beyond technological progress and population growth. The macropolitical economy literature introduces endogenous determination of policy choices in otherwise standard macroeconomic models.1 Economists typically view policy choices as exogenous or as chosen by a benevolent social planner. The novelty in the macro-political economy approach is the emphasis on the political process and on interpersonal conflicts as determinants of policy choices.

This paper reviews the recent literature which has grown at the intersection of these two very active areas of research. Specifically, we analyse what we have learned and what puzzles (and there are many!) are left unsolved in the area of the socio- political determinants of growth.

____________________
We thank Douglas Hibbs, Torsten Persson and other conference participants for very useful comments. This chapter builds upon a paper that circulated under the title: "The Political Economy of Growth: A Critical Survey of the Recent Literature and Some New Results", and was published in the World Bank Economic Review 1994. We are very grateful for the comments received from Shanta Devarajan, William Easterly and Lant Pritchett. We also acknowledge financial support from the National Science Foundation.
1
For recent surveys see Persson and Tabellini ( 1990), Alesina, Roubimi and Cohen ( 1997), and Alesina and Perotti ( 1995).

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Government and Growth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.