BOOK 7
Charite (and Lucius) Rescued: Further Ordeals
of Lucius

1 as soon as day dawned to dispel the darkness, and the sun's gleaming chariot brought brightness to the world, there was a fresh arrival. He belonged to the gang of robbers, as their ritual greeting to each other revealed. He was panting as he took his seat by the entrance to the cave. Once he had recovered his breath, this was the message that he brought to the company. 'We can stop worrying and breathe easily so far as Milo's house at Hypata is concerned, the house which we plundered the other day. After you had valiantly carried everything off and returned to base here, I mingled with the crowd of citizens, pretending to be indignant and outraged. I took'note of the plans being laid to investigate the crime, whether they would decide to track down the robbers and to what extent this would be carried out, so that I could report everything to you according to your instructions. The whole crowd had reasonable grounds rather than doubtful arguments for accusing a certain Lucius as the clear culprit of the crime. A few days earlier he had brought a forged letter of introduction. He passed himself off to Milo as an honest man, winning his confidence so intimately that he was even welcomed as a guest and treated as a close friend. He had stayed a few days in the house, and had inveigled himself into the affections of Milo's maidservant by pretending to be in love with her. By this means he had carefully reconnoitred the bars on the gate, and the very rooms in which all the family wealth was usually kept.

2 'The evidence pointing to his being the miscreant was not slight, for he had made off at the very time when the crime was committed, and had not been seen anywhere since. His means of escape had been ready at hand, enabling him to outstrip his pursuers and to go ground further and further

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