The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry in English

By Ian Hamilton | Go to book overview

K

KALLMAN, Chester ( 1921-75), was born in Brooklyn and educated at Brooklyn College and the University of Michigan. Kallman met W. H. ★Auden in 1939 and became the elder poet's lifelong companion, although the two men spent much time apart and the relationship was sometimes stormy. After Auden's death in 1973, Kallman's life, already dissolute and disorganized, went even more out of control; he died in his sleep in his Athens apartment.

Kallman's three volumes of poetry-- Storm at Castelfranco ( New York, 1956), Absence and Presence ( New York, 1963), and The Sense of Occasion ( New York, 1971)--show a gift for terse, often astringently witty lyrics whose prevailing tone is one of disenchantment. Kallman's twofold histrionic gift for aria-like effects and for impersonation appears in such poems as 'The Solitudes: A Little Cantata' and 'The African Ambassador. A Suite', the latter a series of monologues about experience and estrangement. Kallman is probably best known for the opera libretti on which he collaborated with Auden, notably those for Stravinsky The Rake's Progress ( 1951) and Hans Werner Henze's Elegy Young Lovers ( 1961) and The Bassarids ( 1966). With Auden, Kallman also translated opera libretti, including those of Mozart Don Giovanni and The Magic Flute and Brecht and Weill The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny and The Seven Deadly Sins. On his own, Kallman translated the libretti of Monteverdi The Coronation of Poppea, Donizetti Anna Bolena, and Bartok Duke Bluebeard's Castle. An interesting account of Auden and Kallman's years together is Dorothy J. Farnan's Auden in Love ( New York, 1984), written by Kallman's long-time friend and stepmother. [ RHa

KAMAL, Daud ( 1935-87), was born in Abbottabad, Pakistan, received his early education at a public school, and later attended the universities of Peshawar and Cambridge. He was professor of English in the University of Peshawar. During an academic tour in December 1987 he died of heart failure in New York.

Kamal published two volumes of translations of Urdu poetry before his own first collection, Recognitions, appeared in England (Budleigh Salterton, 1979) with an introduction by Anthony ★Thwaite, who wrote of Kamal's unsentimental wistfulness and of his concern for 'the fragments of the past, summoned up in brilliant but reticent images'. In his second book, A Remote Beginning (Budleigh Salterton, 1985), Kamal continued to join imagist practice to the poetics of the Urdu ghazal and the haiku. Sadness alternates with outrage, and two styles are discernible throughout: lyric-narrative, as in 'The Street of Nightingales' and 'Water Carrier', and the staccato-telegraphese of 'River Mist★. [ AHa

KANTARIS, Sylvia ( 1936- ), was born in the Derbyshire Peak District, and now lives in Cornwall. She studied at Bristol University and at Queensland, Australia, where she was influenced by the French Surrealists, on whom she wrote her MA and Ph.D theses. She has been a tutor for the Open University, and was Cornwall's first Writer in the Community. Her collections are Time and Motion ( Sydney, 1975; Helston, Cornwall, 1986); The Tenth Muse

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The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry in English
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Selection of Anthologies xi
  • Key to Contributors xiv
  • Alphabetical List of Contributors xvii
  • A 1
  • B 28
  • C 80
  • D 113
  • E 143
  • F 156
  • G 179
  • H 206
  • I 247
  • J 251
  • K 266
  • L 284
  • M 318
  • N 375
  • O 393
  • P 407
  • Q 436
  • R 437
  • S 468
  • T 533
  • U 555
  • V 557
  • W 562
  • Y 593
  • Z 599
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