Parapsychology, Frontier Science of the Mind: A Survey of the Field, the Methods, and the Facts of ESP and PK Research

By J. B. Rhine; J. G. Pratt | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
The Facts About Psi and Its Types

WHILE we shall take for granted that the reader who has come so far as to begin this chapter will have a sufficiently open mind to consider this necessarily brief review of the case for psi, adequate references will be given for any who may wish more extensive evidence.

In presenting the facts about psi we must, of course, leave the reader to determine for himself the extent of his acceptance of them. At the same time, it is taken for granted that any accurate presentation of evidence on an important question merits attention, whatever the preconceptions of the reader. Science--we all like to think--needs and accepts no authority; its course is determined by its facts. The findings here summarized are receiving attention, however, not only because of the reliability of the evidence in support of them, but also because they are manifestly important to many departments of human interest.

After a consideration of the evidence for the establishment of psi, there will be a review of the different types of psi occurrence that have been experimentally isolated. There will be left for succeeding chapters the facts about psi in its relation to the physical world, about its psychological nature, and its relation to some of the other fields of science.


I. The Evidence for Psi

It is now safe to say--though only recently so--that the collections of spontaneous case material themselves constitute valuable evidence in support of the occurrence of psi. It is quite true that this material would not be sufficient by itself, but along with the experimental evidence it offers a very considerable amount of

-45-

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Parapsychology, Frontier Science of the Mind: A Survey of the Field, the Methods, and the Facts of ESP and PK Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Part I - Present Knowledge 3
  • Chapter I - A Field of Science 5
  • Chapter 2 - Objective Research Methods 17
  • Reference 43
  • Additional Reading 44
  • Chapter 3 - The Facts About Psi and Its Types 45
  • Chapter 4 - Psi and the Physical World 66
  • Chapter 5 - The Psychology of Psi 78
  • Chapter 6 - Psi Research and Other Related Fields 101
  • Part II - Testing Techniques 129
  • Chapter 7 - Psychological Recommendations for Psi Testing 131
  • Chapter 8 - Some Basic Psi Test Procedures 139
  • Additional Reading 168
  • Chapter 9 - Statistical Methods 170
  • Tables 189
  • Some Significant Events In Parapsychology 199
  • Glossary 205
  • Name Index 211
  • Subject Index 213
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