The Oxford History of Medieval Europe

By George Holme | Go to book overview

EDITOR'S POSTSCRIPT

BY 1500, the date at which we have chosen to end this book, the flowering of medieval European civilization which accompanied the great population explosion of the years from 1000 to 1300 was already in the distant past, as far away from the men of that time as the ancien régime before the French Revolution is from us. The immediate effect of the period of expansion had been to create a society in western Europe in which the evidence of uniformity and the pursuit of common purposes had been strong. We see this, for example, in the enterprises of the crusades which began in 1094 and extended with varying intensity and success until the late thirteenth century. Crusading armies were drawn from the knightly aristocracy of England, northern France, and Germany. They also involved ships from the Italian commercial cities and soldiers from Sicily and Catalonia. Kings such as St Louis of France and Edward I were still drawn across the Mediterranean by the impulse to free the Holy Land and attack the Muhammadan in the middle of the thirteenth century.

If we look more closely at the internal structure of civilization before 1300 we shall also see widespread evidence of a common culture and a tendency towards common ideals and even centralization, especially in the world of religion. From one point of view the most remarkable creation of the medieval world was the papacy. By the mid-thirteenth century priests throughout Europe to the west of the area dominated by the Greek Orthodox Church had become willing to accept the authority of Rome in matters of doctrine, in the judicial power to settle disputes involving benefices, in the power of veto over appointments of bishops and even in the levying of heavy taxation. The power of the pope was of course very imperfect, limited by the resistance of kings who wanted to control churches in their kingdoms and by the wish of lords to appoint their relations to churches on their estates. It was to some

-324-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Oxford History of Medieval Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.