English Dictionaries, 800-1700: The Topical Tradition

By Werner Hüllen | Go to book overview

5
Treatises on terminology
5.1 General
5.2 Husbandry
5.2.1 The boke of husbandrie
5.2.2 The English Husbandman and The English Hus-wife
5.3 Rhetoric: A treatise of Schemes and Tropes
5.4 Geometry
5.4.1 The pathway to Knowledg
5.4.2 A Regiment for the Sea
5.5 Seafaring: A Sea Grammar

1. General

So far, explanations and quotations have shown an obvious proximity of onomasiological works to encyclopaedias. But there is also a proximity to treatises which use the onomasiological principle within scientific disciplines with (more or less) strictly systematized terminology such as those that began to appear in the sixteenth century.

These treatises ranged from the art of letter writing to cookery, from husbandry to seafaring. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, a plethora of such works appeared on the market covering all domains of life and having the general aim of making expert knowledge public, because this knowledge had hitherto mostly been developed and handed down from generation to generation only in élite circles like monasteries, universities, or learned societies.1 This tendency is in accordance with the general trend of the secularization of knowledge and of its application to and for the sake of the general good. Francis Bacon ( 1561-1626) was the most eminent and widely read promoter of this idea.2

____________________
1
At the same time many alphabetical dictionaries for the learned professions and for the crafts, for trade and commerce appeared which had the same intentions. See Osselton 1999.
2
Many treatises of the kind discussed here appeared prior to Bacon's works. This shows that the idea of applied scientific knowledge, generally attributed to Bacon, is in fact much older and may have been adopted by him from earlier popular literature. See Whitney 1990.

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English Dictionaries, 800-1700: The Topical Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Publisher's Acknowledgement ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures x
  • Tables xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Note on the Text xvi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • A. Opening the Topic 1
  • 1 - The Onomasiological Approach 3
  • 2 - On Establishing a Tradition 28
  • B: The English Tradition of Onomasiology 41
  • 3 - Hermeneumata, Latin-English Glosses, and Nominales 43
  • 4 - Colloquies, Wordbooks, and Dialogues for Teaching and Learning Foreign Languages 78
  • 5 - Treatises on Terminology 140
  • 6 - John Withals' Dictionary for Young Boys (1553) 168
  • 7 - James Howell's Dictionary for the Genteel (1660) 202
  • 8 - John Wilkins' Comprehensive Thesaurus of English (1668) 244
  • C - The European Scene (1400-1700) 303
  • 9 - Multilingual Dictionaries and Nomenclators 305
  • 10 - The Case of Johannes Amos Comenius 361
  • D. Reflections on the Topic 431
  • 11 - Towards Mental Lexicography 433
  • Appendix 449
  • Bibliography 491
  • Index 515
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