Social Change and the Experience of Unemployment

By Duncan Gallie; Catherine Marsh et al. | Go to book overview

economic process and the extent to which it stems from more complex motivating influences associated with the social roles adopted by married couples remain unresolved. The important conclusion drawn from this study is that there exists such cross- couple state dependence, not to the degree previously thought to be evident, but important enough to warrant further investigation.


NOTES
1.
For example, in the 'pre- 1988' benefits regime, in a family of 2 adults and 2 children in receipt of supplementary benefit on account of the long-term unemployment of the husband, the net increase in house­ hold income from a decision by the wife to increase her weekly hours of work from 0 to 30 hours is ú£4, given that above ú£4, each ú£1 of her income reduces her husband's entitlement to supplementary benefit by ú£1.
2.
The manual/non-manual distinction is made with reference to the social class categories of the 1980 Classifications of Occupations, where non-manual is defined as social class categories I, II, and III (non-manual).
3.
For example, the number of 1986 partnerships in existence at earlier years is as follows:
Age of wife in 1986
(years)
No. of couples for whom 1986 partnership was
in existence in
1970 1975 1980 1983 1986
35-39 72 142 161 169 180
50-54 85 87 91 92 98
4.
It appears that Moylanet al. ( 1984) limited their attempts at control to one variable at a time for similar reasons.
5.
The problem here is ensuring consistent estimation of the structural (i.e. the β) parameters. Roughly speaking, consistency means that the parameter estimates approach the true values of the parameters as the sample size increases. This is usually regarded as the minimum requirement of an acceptable estimation procedure. Consistency is prejudiced when, as in this model, the number of error terms or 'nuisance parameters' increases without limit as the sample size increases ( Neyman and Scott 1948).

-185-

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