Social Change and the Experience of Unemployment

By Duncan Gallie; Catherine Marsh et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The economic benefits of employment were the main exception to this. Several members of the sample did report financial problems or worries.
2.
Only one locality was used because this analysis relies heavily on many of the team-specific questions which were asked only in Northampton.
3.
Employees' perceptions of the internal labour market were measured by asking them whether they saw the best opportunities of advancement as being with their current employer or with another employer.
4.
The other 7% of the sample were excluded because they formed clusters of less than six individuals (i.e. less than 1% of the sample). In the cases that were inspected closely this was because either they had very unusual patterns of responses on the variables, or they had clearly been flippant in their responses.
5.
Additional analyses showed that these disadvantaged employees actually had slightly (but again not significantly) worse psychological health than the unemployed if the direct effect of poverty on psychological health was controlled for.
6.
There was some considerable variation around this time interval between interviews. The median duration was 248 days (8.2 months), but the lower and upper deciles were 166 days (5.4 months) and 293 days (9.6 months). While there was a small, predictable effect that the unemployed respondents from the first survey who were recontacted sooner were more likely to still be unemployed, this does not detract from the main results reported here.
7.
It is also likely that the two groups of men in McKenna and Fryer's study differed in another important way, their perceived social status--a quality that is held to be significant in a number of social- psychological theories of unemployment including Jahoda ( 1982), Warr ( 1987), and Kelvin and Jarrett ( 1983). But it could be argued that this, in turn, is further evidence that orientation towards the future, rather than the present, is the critical determinant of the psychological functioning of the individual.

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