The Application of EC Law by National Courts: The Free Movement of Goods

By Malcolm A. Jarvis | Go to book overview

Preface

Selecting the appropriate balance in the title for this book was a difficult task. The dilemma was essentially whether the title should most reflect the emphasis in this work on the more general application of European Community law by national courts, or rather the accent on the specific area of the provisions within the EC Treaty concerning the free movement of goods. Since the issues arising from the application of the provisions concerning the free movement of goods by the national courts have such wide implications (being representative of the application of any of the other four freedoms and indeed the application of EC law by the national courts in general) it was felt that this should be reflected in the title. It is hoped that this work will add to the growing awareness of the pivotal role played by the national courts as the 'Community Courts', whilst also providing a thought-provoking analysis of the free-movement-of-goods provisions in the EC Treaty.

This book is based on a doctoral thesis conferred by the University of Groningen under the supervision of Professor Laurence Gormley. My thanks are due to him and to that institution. I also wish to express my gratitude to Professor Jacqueline Dutheil de la Rochère, Professor Jan Jans and Professor John Usher who comprised the reading committee for the thesis and to Professor Stephen Weatherill and Professor René Barents who acted as additional examiners for the award of the degree with distinction.

Thanks are also due to my parents for their ever present support and to Patrick Higgins, Paul McHugh, and Lambros Kilaniotis for their early encouragement of my academic endeavours. A special word of thanks must go to Frea Rijnsbergen and Fabian Amtenbrink for acting as my two 'paranymphs' and for our solidarity and friendship during my time in Groningen. Finally, I must thank my wife, Hilary, who forfeited much for what has resulted in this book.

MAJ January 1998

-xiii-

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