On Stage: A History of Theatre

By Vera Mowry Roberts | Go to book overview

PLAY LIST
As basic material for the study of theatre, it is suggested that one or more plays in each of the groups below be read as the periods in which they were first produced are studied. For the plays which are more difficult to find, volumes including them are listed in the appropriate sections of the bibliography. For those which have been more universally printed, the sources are numerous enough to make a specific listing unnecessary.
Primitive and classic theatre
(chapters 1,2,3,4)
Aeschylus: Agamemnon
Aristophanes: The Birds, The Frogs
Euripides: Medea, Electra
Menander: The Girl from Samos
Plautus: Miles Gloriosus
Sophocle: Antigone, Oedipus Rex
Terence: Phormio

The Middle Ages
(chapter 5)
The Brome Abraham and Isaac
The Chester Mystery Plays
Everyman
Heywood John: Johan, Johan
Maistre Pierre Pathelin
Lyndsay David: Satire of the Three Estates
The Second Shepherds Play ( Wakefield Cycle)
The York Cycle of Mystery Plays

The Renaissance
(chapter 6,7,8)
Aretino: one of the dialogues in Works, vol. 1
Calderón: Life is a dream
Dekker Thomas: The Shoemakers' Holiday
Greene Robert: Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Jonson Ben: the Alchemist Volpone
Kyd Thomas: The Spanish Tragedy
Lope de Vega: The Mayor of Zalamea Madrid Steel
Machiavelli Niccolo: Mandragola
Massinger Philip: A New Way to Pay Old Debts
Shakespeare William: Any or all
Tasso: Aminta

The Seventeenth Century
(chapters 9,10)
Congreve William: Love for Love, The Way of the World
Corneille Pierre: Le Cid
Dryden John: All for Love, or The World Well Lost
Etherege George: The Man of Mode
Farquhar George: The Beaux Stratgem
Molière: The Misanthrope, The Imaginary Invalid, Tartuffe
Otway Thomas: Venice Preserved
Racine Jean: Athalie, Esther, Phèdre
Vanbrugh John: The Relapse
Wycherley William: The Country Wife

The Eighteenth Century
(chapters 11,12)
Addison Joseph: Cato
Beaumarchais: The Barber of Seville the Marriage of Figaro
Cumberland Richard: The West Indian
Goethe Johann Wolfgang von: Faust Part I
Goldoni Carlo: The Mistress of the Inn
Goldsmith Oliver: She Stoops to Conquer
Gozzi Carlo: The Three Oranges
Lessing G. E.: Minna von Barnhelm
Lillo George: The London Merchant, or, The History of George Barnwell
Sheridan Richard Brinsley: School for Scandal
Steele Richard: The Conscious Lovers
Voltaire: Zaïre

Oriental Theatre
(chapter 13)
A Bunraku Play
A Kabuki Play
A Noh Play
Hsiung H. I.: Lady Precious Stream
The Little Clay Cart
Sakuntala

The Nineteenth Century
(chapters 14, 15)
Bird Robert Montgomery: The Broker of Bogotà
Boker George Henry: Francesca da Rimini
Bulwer-Lytton Edward: Richelieu The Lady of Lyons
Dumas Alexandre (fils): The Lady of the Camelias
Gogol Nikolai: The Inspector General
Herne James A.: Margaret Fleming

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On Stage: A History of Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - The Ever-Present Beginnings 1
  • 2 - Drama in Ancient Egypt 15
  • 3 - The Golden Age of Greece 21
  • 4 - Imitations and Innovations of the Romans 55
  • 5 - Theatre in the Middle Ages 78
  • 6 - Renaissance Theatre in Italy, France, and Germany 106
  • 7 - Shakespeare and the Elizabethans 134
  • 8 - Spanish Theatre in the Renaissance 172
  • 9 - The Golden Days in France 197
  • 10 - The Restoration in England 228
  • 11 - Developments in England and America 251
  • 12 - Cross-Currents in Continental Theatre 286
  • 13 - Oriental Theatre 320
  • 14 - European Romanticism 347
  • 15 - Commercial Theatre in England and America 378
  • 16 - Theatre's Great Revolution 409
  • 17 - Theatre Today 440
  • 18 - Summing Up 489
  • Glossary of Terms 506
  • Bibliography 509
  • Index 519
  • Index 527
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