John Keats: Selected Poetry

By John Keats; Elizabeth Cook | Go to book overview

La belle dame sans merci

O what can ail thee knight at arms
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge has withered from the Lake
And no birds sing!

O what can ail thee knight at arms
So haggard and so woe begone?
The squirrel's granary is full
And the harvest's done.

I see a lilly on thy brow
With anguish moist and fever dew, 10And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too--

I met a Lady in the Meads
Full beautiful, a faery's child
Her hair was long, her foot was light
And her eyes were wild--

I made a Garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant Zone:
She look'd at me as she did love
And made sweet moan-- 20

I set her on my pacing steed
And nothing else saw all day long
For sidelong would she bend and sing
A faery's song--

She found me roots of relish sweet
And honey wild and manna dew
And sure in language strange she said
'I love thee true'--

She took me to her elfin grot
And there she wept and sigh'd full sore 30And there I shut her wild wild eyes
With kisses four.

-166-

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John Keats: Selected Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Chronology xix
  • Note on Text xxiii
  • Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison 2
  • To Hope 2
  • Ode to Apollo 4
  • Lines Written on 29 May, the Anniversary of Charles's Restoration, on Hearing the Bells Ringing 5
  • 'O Solitude! If I Must with Thee Dwell' 6
  • 'Give Me Women Wine and Snuff' 6
  • 'I Am as Brisk' 6
  • 'O Grant That like to Peter I' 7
  • To My Brother George 7
  • To Charles Cowden Clarke 11
  • On First Looking into Chapman's Homer 14
  • Sleep and Poetry 14
  • To My Brothers 25
  • Addressed to [haydon] 26
  • To Kosciusko 26
  • 'I Stood Tip-Toe Upon a Little Hill' 27
  • Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition 33
  • 'After dark vapors have oppress'd our plains' 33
  • On seeing the Elgin Marbles 34
  • On a Leander which Miss Reynolds my kind friend gave me 34
  • On the Sea 35
  • 'Hither hither Love' 35
  • On Oxford 76
  • 'Before he went to live with owls and bats' 77
  • To Mrs Reynoldse's Cat 78
  • Lines on seeing a Lock of Milton's hair 78
  • On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again 79
  • 'When I have fears that I may cease to be' 80
  • 'O blush not so, O blush not so' 80
  • Lines on the Mermaid Tavern 81
  • Robin Hood 82
  • 'O thou whose face hath felt the Winter's wind' 84
  • The Human Seasons 84
  • 'For there's Bishop's Teign' 85
  • 'Where be ye going you Devon maid' 86
  • 'Over the hill and over the dale' 87
  • To J. H. Reynolds Esq. 88
  • Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil 91
  • 'Old Meg she was a Gipsey' 107
  • 'There was a naughty Boy' 108
  • Sonnet to Ailsa Rock 111
  • 'There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain' 111
  • 'Not Aladin magian' 113
  • 'Upon my Life Sir Nevis I am piqued' 114
  • Nature withheld Cassandra in the Skies 117
  • "Tis the witching time of night" 117
  • 'And What is Love?--It is a Doll Dress'D Up' 119
  • Fragment: 'Welcome Joy, and Welcome Sorrow' 119
  • Fragments: 'Where's the Poet? Show him! show him!' 120
  • To Homer 121
  • Hyperion: A Fragment Book I 121
  • Fancy 143
  • 'I had a dove and the sweet dove died' 147
  • Song: 'Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush my dear' 147
  • The Eve of St. Agnes 148
  • The Eve of St. Mark 160
  • 'Gif ye wol stonden hardie wight' 163
  • 'Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell' 164
  • 'He is to weet a melancholy Carle' 164
  • A dream, after reading Dante's Episode of Paolo and Francesca 165
  • La Belle Dame Sans Merci 166
  • Sonnet to Sleep 167
  • Ode to Psyche 168
  • On Fame 169
  • On Fame 170
  • 'If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd' 170
  • Two or three Posies 171
  • Ode on Indolence 172
  • 'shed No Tear--O Shed No Tear' 174
  • Ode to a Nightingale 174
  • Ode on a Grecian Urn 177
  • Ode on Melancholy 178
  • The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream 179
  • Lamia 193
  • 'Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes' 211
  • To Autumn 212
  • 'Bright Star, would I were stedfast as thou art' 213
  • On Coaches 214
  • 'What Can I Do to Drive Away' 215
  • To Fanny 217
  • 'this Living Hand, Now Warm and Capable' 218
  • 'In After Time a Sage of Mickle Lore' 219
  • Notes 220
  • Further Reading 245
  • Glossary of Classical Names 247
  • Index of Titles and First Lines 257
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