The United States, Great Britain, and British North America from the Revolution to the Establishment of Peace after the War of 1812

By A. L. Burt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
THE WAR OF 1812: ITS OPERATIONS1

THE fighting of the War of 1812 is a story so well known to Canadians and Americans, having been so often told, that it would be tedious and superfluous to repeat it here. Moreover it would be out of place in this study of Canadian-American relations, to which it would make little or no contribution. But it is very pertinent to try to find the explanation and significance of what happened in this war, which calls for an analytical rather than a descriptive treatment.

Most Canadians are prone to ignore the fact, which Americans can never forget, that the War of 1812 was oceanic as well as continental. The distinction is fundamental. It should not be confused with that between naval and military operations, which in this war is purely artificial. The naval operations on the Lakes, which were completely separate from those on the sea, were subsidiary to the military operations around the Lakes and therefore should be considered with them in an examination of the war on land. The struggle on the sea stands by itself and was of vital importance. It conditioned the war on land but was not conditioned by it.

The nature of the war on the sea had often been predicted. The United States Navy being then negligible and the Royal Navy invincible, no battle between fleets was possible. Each side therefore sought to reduce the other by crippling its commerce in the only way it could, the Americans by raiding and the British by blockade, the natural method of warfare between a strong naval power and a weak one.

The United States had no ship of the line, nor any use for one. The American task called for numbers rather than size, speed rather than strength. Numbers could scatter to prey more widely, and speed spelled safety from capture by superior force. The marauders appeared on every sea, and were particularly active where the lines of communication from all over the world converged upon Great Britain. British trade and shipping suffered severe damage. Most of it was inflicted by privateers,

____________________
1
Of the numerous accounts of the War of 1812, large and small, early and late, special and general, the best is probably that found in Adams, Vols. VI-IX, and the next best is A. T. Mahan, Sea Power in Its Relations to the War of 1812. C. P. Lucas, The Canadian War of 1812 ( Oxford, 1906), is also excellent.

For documents, see A.S.P.M.A., Vol. I ( Washington, 1832); William Wood (ed.), Select British Documents of the Canadian War of 1812, 3 vols. (Publications of the Champlain Society, 1920-23); and E. A. Cruikshank, Documentary History of the Capaigns upon the Niagara Frontier, 1812- 1814 ( Lundy's Lane Historical Society Publications, Vol. III, Parts I-VIII, 1902-7).

-317-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States, Great Britain, and British North America from the Revolution to the Establishment of Peace after the War of 1812
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.