The United States, Great Britain, and British North America from the Revolution to the Establishment of Peace after the War of 1812

By A. L. Burt | Go to book overview

INDEX
Adams, Henry: criticism of Madison's war message, 312-313; comparison of War of 1812 with Civil War, 323
Adams, John, 24, 31, 108, 110; the St. Croix boundary, 39; successful champion of American fishermen in negotiations of 1782, 46-54; consulted on identity of St. Croix, 75 n; minister to Great Britain, interest in St. Croix problem, 77, 79, 80; demands surrender of western posts, 97-98; calls for American navigation law as lever against Great Britain, 99; despairs of getting western posts till United States observes the treaty, 100; withdrawal from London, 106; procures release of impressed seamen in 1785, 110; advice in Nootka Sound crisis, 113; casting vote defeats nonintercourse bill, 1794, 142; fails to uphold claim based on Mitchell's map, 163; makes peace with France, 1800, 210
Adams, John Quincy: convention of 1803, 194, 195; minister to Russia, 345- 346; appointed peace commissioner, 1813, 345-346; instructions, 346-347; appointment renewed and new instructions, 1814, 348; outspoken against inclusion of Indians in Treaty of Ghent, 358; favors breaking off negotiations, 358, 359; argues that Indian article revived Article III of Jay's Treaty, 359, 366, 371, 376; on fisheries and the Mississippi, 364, 366-367; contention for Moose Island, 369; defiant on fisheries, 369-370; complaints against British searching Americans on Lakes, 384, 386; disarmament on Lakes, 388-390, 394-395; protests exclusion of American fishermen, 402; unyielding on fisheries, 404; urges further suspension of excluding orders, 407; intractable on fisheries, 409-410; yields under Monroe, 410; discussions with Bagot on Columbia River region, 412-415
Adams, Samuel: champion of American fishermen, 44, 53
Adams, William, 352
Adams, United States frigate, burned, 341
Addington, Henry, Prime Minister: discusses New Orleans with Rufus King, 194 n; discusses impressment with Rufus King, 226; ministry tottering, 229
Adet, Pierre Augustus, 176; fights ratification of Jay's Treaty, 169-170; revives effort to revolutionize Canada, 170, 174; recalled, 173
Alexander I, Tsar: offers to mediate, 345; cares less for neutral rights, 347; against Great Britain over Poland, 362
Alexander, Sir William: grant of Nova Scotia to, 37, 164, 187
Allan, John: stirs up dispute over St. Croix, 71, 74, 78, 80
Allen, Ira: plot for conquest of Canada, 171-174, 177; attempts to get land in Eastern Townships, 179 n
Allen, Levi, 66, 69; attempts to get land in Eastern Townships, 179 n
Amherstburg and Fort Erie to be exchanged for Castine and Machias, 360
André, executioner of Major John, 181- 182
Aranda, Count of: suggestions for western boundary of United States, 17, 28- 29
Arbitration: proposed by Continental Congress to determine eastern boundary, 38-39; proposed by Jay to settle dispute over St. Croix, 77, 78-79; and to fill northwest boundary gap, 148; Grenville accepts with condition rejected by Jay, 150; provisions in Jay's Treaty for, 151-152, 154; importance of Jay and his treaty in history of, 157; failure with debts and delay over damages, 161, 186; successful in determining St. Croix, 161-165; convention of 1803, 188-189, 190-191, 192; convention of 1807, 198; Treaty of Ghent, 363, 365, 369, 416, 423-425
Armed Neutrality of the North, 155 n
Armstrong, General John, 283, 284, 335; American minister to France, 267 n; fruitless demands in Paris, 281; confused direction of American strategy in War of 1812, 329331, 332, 334, 336, 337

-427-

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