Behind the Ballots: The Personal History of a Politician

By James A. Farley | Go to book overview

II. The Pre-Election Campaign of 1932

THE VOTE-GETTING GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK. TEAMING WITH LOUIE HOWE. A NEW POLITICAL COMBINATION. THE SMITH-ROOSEVELT FEUD. SELLING ROOSEVELT TO THE PARTY. COLONEL HOUSE AND OTHER LEADERS. GARNER ENTERS THE LISTS. THE HAPPY WARRIOR ENTERS. ON THE POLITICAL MERRY-GO-ROUND. HULL PRESIDENTIAL TIMBER. FIGHT FOR A CONVENTION CHAIRMAN. PUTTING ON THE PRESSURE. EVE OF THE CONVENTION. THE TWO-THIRDS RULE AGAIN. JAMES HAMILTON LEWIS WITHDRAWS. THE CONVENTION OPENS. LAST MINUTE SCRAMBLE FOR DELEGATES. REACHING AN UNDERSTANDING. BALLOTING. GARNER BREAKS THE DEADLOCK. THE CANDIDATE AND HIS CAMPAIGN MANAGER.

WHEN the history of the present era in American politics is written, it will be dominated largely by the overshadowing figure of one individual. Whether friend or foe, every reasonable man and woman is ready, I think, to concede the influence of Franklin D. Roosevelt in shaping the course of contemporary government in the United States. He stands in the panorama of public life like a mountain peak above the plain.

To those who disagree with him, he is a sinister force seeking to undermine and destroy traditional principles of government. To those of us associated with him, he is now, as he has been, the living voice of democracy and the greatest popular leader of his age. In writing this material, however, it is not my purpose to add to the controversy. Rather, I hope, to present honestly my own views--my understanding of the events and the men and women who have had a hand in making present-day history.

In this chapter an effort is made to go behind the scenes in the job of nominating a man for President of the United States, to

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Behind the Ballots: The Personal History of a Politician
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • I. My Early Life 3
  • Ii. the Pre-Election Campaign of 1932 58
  • Iii. the Birth of the New Deal 155
  • Iv. the Post Office Department 253
  • V. the 1936 Election 289
  • Vi. F.D.R. 328
  • Vii. Looking Forward 356
  • Index 377
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 394

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.