Planning and Paying for Full Employment

By Frank D. Graham; Abba P. Lerner | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

IN THE summer of 1944 the American Labor Conference on International Affairs called a conference of economist to discuss the question of how to achieve peacetime full employment in the United States. The conference met in Princeton, New Jersey, with some of the sessions being held in the Nassau Tavern and some in the home of Professor Frank D. Graham of Princeton University, who had first broached the idea. The economists who attended the conference, several of whom are closely associated with the American labor movement, were thus enabled to have a prolonged discussion of the problem in all its aspects Varian Fry, executive director of the American labor Conference, acted as chairman of the sessions, and Dr. Albert Halasi, economist on the Conference's research staff, served as secretary.

The purpose of the meeting was to take the first steps toward working out a program for postwar full employment which all the members of the group could endorse. To assist in the preparation of the draft of such a program, the participants subsequently submitted the papers which are included in this symposium. With the exception of Miss Margaret Joseph's paper, which was drawn up in advance to guide the discussion at Princeton, all the papers were written after the meeting. Carl Landauer and Henry Simons did not attend the meetings, but their papers have been included in the symposium to make the treatment of the problem more complete.

The symposium was first published in two consecutive issues of International Post-War Problems, the journal of the American Labor Conference ( October 1945 and January 1946), and, with some changes, is reproduced in this book.

THE EDITORS

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