Bill Haywood's Book: The Autobiography of William D. Haywood

By William D. Haywood | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
"ARTICLE 2, SECTION 6"

THERE was thunderous applause at the protest meeting in Cooper Union in New York, on behalf of Ettor and Giovanitti.

It was the rumble of just such applause, I said in my speech, that gave me courage and strength when I was in the same position as the men in whose behalf we are appealing to you to-night. I feel that my life must have been preserved by you for such occasions as this, and I feel now that it is not me to whom you are giving this magnificent reception, but the principles for which I stand. Your applause is but an echo of your hearts, but an echo of your own desires, and you realize that the men who are in jail in Lawrence are in jail because they are fighting your battles. I felt that when I was in jail in Boise. And I know that without the united action of the workingmen and women of New York City, of the state of New York, of the United States of America and of the world, instead of appealing to you here to-night on behalf of Ettor and Giovanitti, my comrades and I would have been judicially murdered by the authorities of the state of Idaho. The mine owners of Colorado had determined to bring about our death, even as these vultures of capitalism intend to make horrible examples of Ettor and Giovanitti. . . .

The police killed Anna LaPiza. The picket line was out that morning, 23,000 strong, an endless chain of pickets. And the police began to crowd them, crowded them up Common street, up Union street, down Broadway, until they were massed in so thick that they could not move back any further. Then the policemen began to club them. Some of the sympathizers threw coal from the windows. The strikers themselves threw snowballs and chunks of ice at the policemen. And one of the policemen was hit with a chunk of coal or a chunk of ice on the leg. It was the sergeant. He ordered the policemen to pull out the guns. And as they did, they fired. And officer Benoit is said to have fired the shot that killed Anna LaPiza. Nineteen witnesses saw him fire the shot. Anna LaPiza died, the second martyr to the Lawrence strike.

The second day after she was killed, Joseph J. Ettor and Arturo Giovanitti were arrested for being accessories to her murder. Ettor or Giovanitti would willingly have laid down their lives to have saved the life of Anna LaPiza. It was they who shed tears when they learned

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