German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace

By Hermann Lutz | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In September, 1948, I left Germany, my native country, to join my wife in New York, and to acquire United States citizenship which was accorded me in June, 1951. An old friend in this country approached me with the suggestion that I write a book on German diplomacy under Hitler, and he kindly obtained a grant for me from an American Foundation.

Since May, 1952, I have had the privilege of doing the required research work at the Hoover Institute and Library on War, Revolution and Peace, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Its unique collection of material relevant to my subject has been invaluable. I am much indebted to Professor Harold H. Fisher, Chairman; Dr. C. Easton Rothwell, Director; Professor Ralph H. Lutz, the former Chairman; Mr. Philip T. McLean, Librarian of the Hoover Institute and Library, for the facilities accorded to me, and for their friendly interest in my work; and to Mrs. Hildegard R. Boeninger, Curator of the Western and Central European Collections of the Hoover Institute and Library, for her help in various ways. I wish to thank also the Staff of the Library for their invariably courteous and efficient assistance.

During my research work I came to the conclusion that, for practical purposes, the original scope should be expanded to embrace a survey of German-French relations since 1870, for they have once more acquired prime importance in European affairs. Consequently, I have collected material for two books, the present one being a precursor of the book originally planned. The second volume will treat German foreign policy under Hitler's chancellorship. Further material collected

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter One - Changing Opinions 3
  • Chapter Two - The Peacemakers' Spirit, 1919 30
  • Chapter Three - Tribulations of the Weimar Republic 96
  • Chapter Four - Why Hitler Rose to Power 105
  • Part Two 145
  • Appendix 179
  • Notes 201
  • Bibliography 247
  • Name Index 253
  • Subject Index 256
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.