German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace

By Hermann Lutz | Go to book overview

may be used for a third book dealing with foreign policy of Britain and the United States during World War II.

In addition to my old friend, others who also wish to remain unnamed, have actively assisted in the publication of the present book. One person, in particular, has made a generous contribution inspired by his desire to help in creating a better world by promoting sound international understanding. Professor Sidney B. Fay has kindly read the manuscript, and I have profited by various suggestions he, as well as other scholars, offered for improving it. My old friend, a skilled and veteran editor, has gone over my manuscript with great care and made changes and emendations in the interest of style and usage. I express my deep gratitude to all concerned.

Permission for lengthy quotations from certain publications has been given by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., New York; by Longmans, Green and Co., New York; and by The Macmillan Company, New York, as recorded in the text and in notes respectively.*

My sincere thanks are also due to the publisher who has ventured to bring out a book the theme of which, in large part at least, still appears to be rather unpopular with influential circles in the United States and elsewhere.

Finally, I wish to pay an especial tribute to my wife, Mrs. Marguerite Voorhees Lutz, who has acted as mediator between her home country and "better" Germany for almost half a century. Her general help, advice, criticism, patience, and faith have been most encouraging.

The Directors of the Foundation who enabled my extensive studies at the Hoover Institute and Library, expressed their belief that "independence of spirit" is "essential to creative research of any kind," and they expect that my writings will represent my "honest convictions." I have been guided by these principles. Thus, I am solely responsible for the contents of--or any omissions in--this book.

Visitors of the Hoover Institute and Library will find in the

____________________
*
The books are: Dr. Alma Luckau, The German Delegation at the Paris Peace Conference ( Columbia University Press, New York, 1941); William L. Langer , European Alliances and Alignments, 1871-1890 ( Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1931); G. P. Gooch, Recent Revelations of European Diplomacy, 4th edition, revised and enlarged 1940 ( Longmans, Green and Co., London and New York, 1940); Hugh R. Wilson, Diplomat Between Wars ( Longmans, Green and Co., New York-Toronto, 1941); and Sidney Bradshaw Fay , The Origins of the World War, 2 vols. ( The Macmillan Company, New York, 1928).

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter One - Changing Opinions 3
  • Chapter Two - The Peacemakers' Spirit, 1919 30
  • Chapter Three - Tribulations of the Weimar Republic 96
  • Chapter Four - Why Hitler Rose to Power 105
  • Part Two 145
  • Appendix 179
  • Notes 201
  • Bibliography 247
  • Name Index 253
  • Subject Index 256
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.