German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace

By Hermann Lutz | Go to book overview

Chapter Two
The Peacemakers' Spirit, 1919

INTRODUCTION

Under the auspices of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Dr. Alma Luckau issued a voluminous book in 1941, entitled The German Delegation at the Paris Peace Conference. This contains twelve letters from Dr. Walter Simons, Commissioner General of the Delegation, written to his wife from Versailles, and seventy official documents. A lengthy introduction by Dr. Luckau outlines the essentials of the proceedings. In a Foreword dated August 7, 1941, Professor James T. Shotwell points out the importance of the publication for future peacemaking and declares:

No more challenging subject could be presented to the historian than . . . the effort of Germany to prepare and plead its case at Versailles in the summer of 1919. It is a story which has never been fully told.1

Due to the distraction produced by the Second World War and its aftermath this story did not receive the wide attention it deserved, especially by those who are concerned with the reconstruction of Europe, the central problem of which is the promotion of a genuine and enduring understanding between the German and the French peoples and their permanent reconciliation.

In 1927, Frank H. Simonds judiciously stressed the fact that it was the spirit of the Treaty of Versailles which made the settlement intolerable for all Germans.2 And, in 1943, Herbert Hoover and Hugh Gibson stated: "The evil spirits of

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German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter One - Changing Opinions 3
  • Chapter Two - The Peacemakers' Spirit, 1919 30
  • Chapter Three - Tribulations of the Weimar Republic 96
  • Chapter Four - Why Hitler Rose to Power 105
  • Part Two 145
  • Appendix 179
  • Notes 201
  • Bibliography 247
  • Name Index 253
  • Subject Index 256
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