German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace

By Hermann Lutz | Go to book overview

Notes
PART ONE
CHAPTER ONE
1. Black Record: Germans Past and Present ( London, 1941). The passages quoted are on pp. 1-3, 8, 16, 21, 30, 39. In his Preface, p. iv, Vansittart declared that if the Germans had had their way, there would have been a war every eight years for the last three- quarters of a century.--Sir Robert was "proud," he wrote, "to be able to dedicate the whole to Miss Dorothy Thompson, whose clear thinking and clear writing have long laid the world in her debt." However, he had not asked Miss Thompson's permission to dedicate his book to her. In fact, their views on Germany differed radically, as Miss Thompson pointed out to the writer, letter of March 16, 1954, referring to a transocean debate on the question of Germany, September 30, 1943, printed in Town Meeting, vol. 9, No. 22, published by American Education Press ( Columbus, Ohio).-- Victor Gollancz, in a reply to Lord Vansittart, Shall Our Children Live or Die? ( London, 1942), p. 5, estimated that by 1942 at least three million persons had read Black Record.
2. Germany's Record: A Reply to Lord Vansittars, Parliamentary Peace Aims Group, House of Commons ( London, 1941). On p. 4 the writers declared they had no doubt that the plain purpose of Black Record was to make plausible Mr. Duff Cooper's statement that the crimes of the Nazis were "the crimes of a whole nation," and that it would be "wishful thinking and dangerous thinking to believe that we could drive a wedge between the German Government and the German people."
3. Clearly demonstrated by Captain Russell R. N. Grenfell, in Unconditional Hatred: German War Guilt and the Future of Europe ( New York, 1953), pp. 25-26.
4. Lessons of My Life ( New York, 1943), p. 23. In a following brochure, The German Octopus ( London-New York-Melbourne- Sydney, 1945), p. 3, Lord Vansittart maintained that the German's "spiritual home has been war."
5. Bones of Contention ( New York, 1945), p. 158. L'Eternelle Allemagne, published under the direction of Wladimir d'Ormesson, Ambassador of France ( Paris, 1945), p. 13.

-201-

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German-French Unity, Basis for European Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter One - Changing Opinions 3
  • Chapter Two - The Peacemakers' Spirit, 1919 30
  • Chapter Three - Tribulations of the Weimar Republic 96
  • Chapter Four - Why Hitler Rose to Power 105
  • Part Two 145
  • Appendix 179
  • Notes 201
  • Bibliography 247
  • Name Index 253
  • Subject Index 256
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