Catholic Devotion in Victorian England

By Mary Heimann | Go to book overview

4
A Community Apart

OVER the latter half of the nineteenth century, English Catholic conceptions of devotion widened in a way which was calculated to encourage active participation from as many members within the community as possible. Not only did manuals of prayer offer an increasingly wide choice of prayers, even the hallowed Garden of the Soul being significantly expanded, but the greatest possible latitude, in that tolerant spirit which was advocated by Catholics as diverse as Faber, Newman, Tyrrell, and von Hügel, was allowed in approaches to individual prayers such as the Memorare and to a range of understandings of traditional devotions like Benediction and the rosary. Hand in hand with this trend towards devotional inclusiveness within the community, there developed an equally strong tendency for Catholics to wish to separate from those outside the fold. These shifts in attitude, which were of social as well as devotional importance, can be traced in successive editions of the catechism and also in the growth and nature of exclusively Catholic societies.

Too little attention has been paid to catechisms in assessing the development of English Catholicism in the period, despite the fact that this summary of the Faith was, for most Catholics, the single most authoritative source of church doctrine, whose phrases, memorized in childhood, would readily spring to mind in the face of any religious question. The importance of the catechism from this point of view was one of which the English bishops seem to have been particularly conscious. When, on 8 February 1869, the bishops who were gathered in Rome for the First Vatican Council began discussion on the proposal that a standard elementary catechism1 be adopted for the whole church,

great divergence of opinion was manifested, especially on the proposal that Bellarmine's catechism, in use at Rome, should be the norm; the German bishops were very adverse to the supplanting of Canisius' catechism by any other, it being in universal use throughout the German lands, and most excellent in itself.2

Representing the other side of the debate, a Spanish bishop declared, with no little rhetorical flourish, that:

____________________
1
This was the fourth schema of Discipline and Canon Law.
2
C. Butler, The Vatican Council (2 vols.; London, 1930), i. 228.

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Catholic Devotion in Victorian England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vi
  • Contents *
  • I - Received Ideas 1
  • 2 - Devotions in Common 38
  • 3 - Familiar Prayers 70
  • 4 - A Community Apart 100
  • 5 - An English Piety 137
  • Appendix - Devotional Statistics of the Churches, Chapels, and Stations in England and Wales 174
  • Bibliography 201
  • Index 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.