Letters concerning the English Nation

By Voltaire; Nicholas Cronk | Go to book overview

EXPLANATORY NOTES
Johnson = Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language ( 1755).
5. The present Work: the Preface was written by Nicolas Thiriot, who, being in London, saw this book through the press on Voltaire's behalf (see D584, D631). They were old friends, having known each other since 1714, when they worked in the same law practice. ( Thiriot also spells his name ' Thieriot', but Thiriot better represents the pronunciation; Voltaire sometimes spells it 'Tiriot').

the other Compositions of its Author: by the time of the publication of the Letters in 1733, Voltaire was well known to London's reading-public. The following of his works had all been recently published in London: the Essay upon the Civil Wars of France and upon Epick Poetry, Voltaire's first work in English, in 1727, and reprinted in 1728 (twice) and 1731; La Henriade (the first French edition), in 1728, in a quarto edition followed in the same year by three octavo editions; a translation of La Henriade into English blank verse, in 1732; and, also in 1732, an English translation, frequently reprinted, of The History of Charles XII, only a year after the work's first publication in France.

6. about 1731: these dates are incorrect; Voltaire returned to France from England in the autumn of 1728.

will be found entertaining: Voltaire caused a sentence to be excised here; see Note on the Text (p. xxxi).

7. that Letter here: "'A Letter concerning the Burning of Altena'", omitted from this edition, is an answer to some published criticisms of Voltahe Histoire de Charles XII.
9. I made a visit: the 'I' who speaks is not of course Voltaire, but Voltaire's glove-puppet; but there are parallels between the adventures of the invented narrator and visits made to Quakers by the real Voltaire, in particular to Andrew Pitt in Hampstead, and to Edward Higginson in Wandsworth (see Appendix D).

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters concerning the English Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.