Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement

By Harold D. Guither | Go to book overview

Appendix 6
Direct Actions by US Animal Rights Activists
December 9, 1980, Ringling Brothers & Barnum & Bailey Circus, Venice, Florida. Slogans were spray-painted on trailers.
September 1, 1981, Institute for Behavioral Research, Silver Spring, Maryland. Alex Pacheco volunteered to work in the lab, collected data, and took photos implying inhumane treatment and unsanitary conditions. He supplied materials to county police who then confiscated the seventeen research monkeys.
April 2, 1982, University of Maryland, Animal Science Department, College Park. Forty-two rabbits were stolen.
Fall 1982, Chicago, Illinois. An animal laboratory veterinarian received a bomb threat.
December 25, 1982, Howard University, Medical Science Building, Washington, D.C. Nerve transmission studies were interrupted when cats valued at nearly $3,000 were stolen. The ALF was allegedly involved.
December 25, 1982, University of Florida, School of Medicine, Miami. ALF allegedly stole two rats.
December 27, 1982, US Naval Research Laboratory, Bethesda, Maryland. ALF allegedly stole one dog.
December 28, 1982, University of California, Berkeley. "Urban Gorillas" stole one cat and two kittens.
January 14, 1983, Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. ALF allegedly stole three dogs.
March 20, 1983. A bomb was placed outside the home of a researcher. It was found by a family member.
June 26, 1983, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. ALF allegedly stole five cats.
August 15, 1983, dog pounds in Ohio. ALF allegedly spray-painted trucks and slashed tires, causing damage estimated at $6,000.
October 1983, University of Maryland, College Park. ALF allegedly broke in and stole a number of rabbits.
December 23, 1983, fur shops, Miami, Florida. ALF vandalized the shops.
December 25, 1983, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. ALF claimed credit for stealing twelve dogs involved in heart research, including five with experimental pacemakers, along with six rats being used in Alzheimer's disease studies.

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