Record of the Oscar S. Straus Memorial Association

By George S. Hellman; Oscar S. Straus Memorial Association | Go to book overview

V THE MEMORIAL TRIPTYCH

By Hildreth Meiere and Louis Ross

BRIEFLY a fter the United States had entered the Second World War there was formed The Citizens Committee for the Army and Navy. Its activities were numerous, the most unusual having to do with art in association with religious services. Requests were made for triptychs to go out "as a.token of esteem to our fighting forces, as a memorial, or as a thanks offering." Chaplains in camp, fort, airfield, base station or ship were eager to receive these triptychs, designed and painted by many artists of distinction. The Oscar S. Straus Memorial Association gladly acceded to the request of Mrs. Junius S. Morgan, the President of the Second Regional Council of the Citizens Committee. Photographs of numerous triptychs previously donated were studied before deciding on the artist to be selected by the Memorial Association. The choice then fell on Hildreth Meiere, whose murals in the Senate and House of Representatives buildings at Washington, in the dome of the National Academy of Sciences, and in many churches had established her nationwide reputation. Mr. Hellman, of the Memorial Association, was appointed a committee of one to confer with the artist. Rabbi Schulman suggested to him that the Straus Memorial triptych might better not have any figure on it as the Old Testament prohibited the worship of any human images, and Orthodox Jewish soldiers and sailors would observe that injunction. God alone should be worshipped. It was thereupon agreed that the triptych should be of a nature available for divine services of whatever religion. There resulted "The Pan-Religion Triptych." On its center panel, inscribed in letters of gold; were the words of the Prophet Micah: "WHAT DOTH THE LORD REQUIRE OF THEE BUT TO DO JUSTLY AND TO LONE MERCY AND TO WALK HUMBLY WITH THY GOD?" Clouds gave the ornamental effect to the inscription;

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Record of the Oscar S. Straus Memorial Association
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • List of Illustrations v
  • I- Introduction 1
  • II- Oscar S. Straus 9
  • III- 70th Congress 2d Session H. J. Res. 377 21
  • IV- Publications 22
  • V- The Memorial Triptych 52
  • Vithe Papers of Oscar S. Straus 54
  • VII- Dedication of the Memorial 62
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