A Dictionary of Finance and Banking

By Brian Butler; David Butler et al. | Go to book overview

R

RAFT Abbreviation for *revolving acceptance facility by tender.

raider An individual or organization that specializes in exploiting companies with undervalued assets by initiating hostile *takeover bids.

rally A rise in prices in a market, such as a stock exchange or commodity market, after a fall. This is usually brought about by a change of sentiment. However, if the change has occurred because there are more buyers than sellers, it is known as a technical rally. For example, unfavourable sentiment might cause a market to fall in turn causing sellers to withdraw at the lower prices. The market will then be sensitive to the presence of very few buyers, who, if they show their hand, may bring about a technical rally.

ramping The practice of trying to boost the image of a security and the company behind it by buying the securities in the market with the object of raising demand; if the price rises, the ramper may be able to make a quick profit by selling.

rand (R) The standard monetary unit of South Africa, divided into 100 cents.

random-walk theory The theory that share prices move, for whatever reason, without any memory of past movements and that the movements therefore follow no pattern. This theory is used to refute the predictions of *chartists, who do rely on past patterns of movements to predict present and future prices.

ratchet effect An irreversible change to an economic variable, such as prices, wages, exchange rates, etc. For example, once a price or wage has been forced up by some temporary economic pressure, it is unlikely to fall back when the pressure is reduced. This rise may be reflected in parallel sympathetic rises throughout the economy, thus fuelling *inflation.

rate1. To assess the creditworthiness of an individual financial instrument, or organization. SeeCREDIT RATING; RATING AGENCY. 2.SeeRATES. 3.SeeINTEREST RATE.

rateable valueseeRATES.

rate anticipation swap An *interest-rate swap in which the swap is related to predicted interest-rate changes. See alsoSWAP.

rate cappingSeeRATES.

rate of exchange (exchange rate) The price of one currency in terms of another. It is usually expressed in terms of how many units of the home country's currency are needed to buy one unit of the foreign currency. However, in some cases, notably in the UK, it is expressed as the number of units of foreign currency that one unit of the home currency will buy. Two rates are usually given, the buying and selling rate; the difference is the profit or commission charged by the organization carrying out the exchange.

rate of interestSeeINTEREST RATE.

rate of return The annual amount of income from an investment, expressed as a percentage of the original investment. This rate is very important in assessing the relative merits of different investments. It is therefore important to note whether a quoted rate is before or after tax, since with most

-291-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Dictionary of Finance and Banking
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 48
  • D 91
  • E 112
  • F 131
  • G 152
  • H 164
  • I 168
  • J 190
  • K 192
  • L 194
  • M 211
  • N 233
  • O 247
  • P 258
  • Q 288
  • R 291
  • S 313
  • T 345
  • U 361
  • V 368
  • W 372
  • X, Y, Z 377
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 378

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.