New York Politics & Government: Competition and Compassion

By Sarah F. Liebschutz; Robert W. Bailey et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

New York's size and complexity are the characteristics that make it an intriguing state; they are also the qualities that make New York a challenging subject to "get one's arms around." I am grateful to Daniel J. Elazar and John Kincaid for inviting me to take on the challenge, and for their close reading and constructive, insightful comments on earlier versions of the manuscript. John Kincaid played a particularly key role in encouraging and helping me to shape the book's theme of competition and compassion.

I thank especially my collaborators, Bob Bailey, Jeff Stonecash, Jane Zacek, and Joe Zimmerman. They extended the breadth and depth of analysis with their contributions; their enthusiasm for the project and responsiveness to deadlines made for a pleasurable partnership.

My student research assistants Mary Hussong-Kallen, Jeffrey D. Cook, Kathleen A. Frank, and Sean Rickert all contributed in important ways. The comments of Justin L. Vigdor and Stephen L. Schechter on selected chapters were especially useful, as was the ongoing willingness of Gerald Benjamin to share his knowledge about New York politics.

Hundreds of New Yorkers--elected and appointed public, private, and nonprofit-sector officials--were interviewed for this book. We are indebted to them for their observations about and insights into various aspects of the history, politics, government, and public policy of the Empire State. Their contributions are specifically referenced throughout the book.

Finally, I am especially grateful for the support and encouragement of four generations of New Yorkers: Goldye K. Fisher, Sanford J. Liebschutz, Jane M. Liebschutz, David S. and Elizabeth H. Liebschutz, and the newest New Yorkers, Jennifer and Rebecca.

-xxiii-

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