The Idea of Social Structure: Papers in Honor of Robert K. Merton

By Lewis A. Coser | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Editors are often tempted to write a wordy prologue in order to explain and justify their efforts. I shall resist that temptation and let the readers of this book make their own judgments. All that seems necessary are a few words to explain the way The Idea of Social Structure came into existence.

When a few of Robert K. Merton's friends and former students realized, hard as it was to believe, that he would reach the age of sixty-five in a few years, they thought about how to celebrate the event and honor the man. To publish a Festschrift seemed an appropriate way to express our gratitude and to register our indebtedness. I was pleased to be asked to become the editor. Our sampling of some earlier Festschriften indicated that those that had best withstood the test of time consisted of work written specifically for the occasion rather than of miscellaneous contributions. I resolved to ask all but a few of those whom I approached to relate their contributions, in any way they judged appropriate, to the work of the man we wished to honor. Most of the contributors agreed to take up a topic that I had suggested to them, and most of them, I am happy to report, stayed with that topic. If the contributions offered here range over a very large sociological territory, this is but a tribute to Robert K. Merton's own breadth of vision and thought.

I am most grateful to all those who have joined me in this venture. I speak for all of them when I say that whatever effort went into writing this volume discharges only a small fraction of the debt we owe, individually and as part of the sociological collectivity, to the work of Robert K. Merton. We hope that it will give pleasure to the man to be honored, but not to him alone.

LEWIS A. COSER

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Idea of Social Structure: Papers in Honor of Robert K. Merton
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 547

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.