The New Nation: A History of the United States during the Confederation, 1781-1789

By Merrill Jensen | Go to book overview

11
The Farmer in the New Nation

THE EXPANSION of American commerce in the years after the American Revolution was based for the most part on an increase in the output of American farms. The surplus crops of the American farmer had been in the past, and were to be for many years to come, a dominating fact in American economic life. The export of farm produce provided the interest and payments on the foreign capital borrowed to build up much of American industry, and the steamboats, canals, and railroads that eventually made possible explosive expansion across a continent. Yet during the Confederation, as before and after, there was the paradox of an expanding agriculture coupled with the often desperate plight of the farmer as an individual.

During these years the American people increased and spread fanwise northward, westward, and southward so rapidly that by 1790 much that had been wilderness in 1776 was as "civilized" as the seaboard settlements. This growth and movement was largely that of farmers whose life, beyond mere subsistence, depended on the export of their crops to foreign markets. During the war itself, some farmers made money and some did not. Wartime inflation raised the price of what they had to buy, as well as of what they had to sell. Many ran into debt for new lands or remained in debt acquired before the war. Perhaps as important as any other factor in the creation of debt was the movement onto new lands which were seldom if ever free except for those who "squatted" until men with legal title arrived to sell to or evict the original settlers.

Deflation began before the war was over. The mercantile and creditor forces regained control of most of the states and the

-234-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Nation: A History of the United States during the Confederation, 1781-1789
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 433

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.