Maine, a Guide down East

By Workers of the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Maine | Go to book overview

ON USING THE GUIDE

General Information on the State contains practical information for the State as a whole; the introduction to each city and tour description also contains specific information of a practical nature.

The Essay Section of the Guide is designed to give a reasonably comprehensive survey of the State's natural setting, history, and social, economic, and cultural development. Limitations of space forbid elaborately detailed treatments of these subjects, but a classified bibliography is included in the book. A great many persons, places, events, and so forth, mentioned in the essays are treated at some length in the city and tour descriptions; these are found by reference to the index. 'Maine: A Guide Down East' is not only a practical travel book; it will also serve as a valuable reference work.

The nineteen Tour Descriptions are written, with a few exceptions, to follow the principal highways from south to north or from east to west. This orientation will not, of course, always coincide with the direction in which the tourist travels through the State. Since most visitors plan their trips as loop tours, it is clearly impossible to accommodate a standard pattern to individual desires, and, for the sake of uniformity, some more or less arbitrary procedure must be adopted. The descriptions are, however, written and printed in such a style that they may be followed in the reverse direction. In many cases the highway descriptions are useful to travelers on railroads. For such travelers the Transportation map on the back of the general State map will be convenient.

As a matter of convenience, lengthy Descriptions of Cities and Towns are removed from the tour sections of the book and separately grouped in alphabetical order. Maps indicate in numerical order the points of interest to be visited.

Each tour description contains cross-references to other tours crossing or branching from the route described; cross-references to all descriptions of cities and towns given special treatment; and cross-references to recreational activities and island trips.

Readers can find the descriptions of important routes by examining Index to Tours or the tour key map. As far as possible, each tour description follows a single main route; descriptions of minor routes branch

-xix-

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