Maine, a Guide down East

By Workers of the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Maine | Go to book overview

TOUR 1A : From JUNCTION WITH US 1 to CAPE NED­ DICK, 15.4 m., Unnumbered road and State 1A.

Via Kittery, Kittery Point, York, York Harbor, York Beach. Two-lane tarred roadbed.

THIS route, an alternate to US 1 just north of the New Hampshire Line, follows the Piscataqua River near the sea.

An unnumbered road branches east from US 1 (seeTour 1, sec. a), 0 m., at a point 0.5 m. north of the Portsmouth Bridge.

KITTERY (alt. 50, Kittery Town, pop. 4400), 0.3 m., is the administrative center of a town, formerly much larger, that was incorporated October 20, 1647, as Piscataqua Plantation. The interests of the village center largely around the Portsmouth Navy Yard (open to public), the entrance to which is right. The yard, established in 1806, is spread over several islands in the Piscataqua River. Admiral Cervera and his staff, captured during the Spanish-American War, were technically held prisoners in the yard for a time. The so-called Portsmouth Conference, for the arrangement of the treaty of peace at the end of the Russo- Japanese War, was held here, the treaty being signed in the Supply Department Building.

Kittery has been interested in shipbuilding since its earliest days. The 'Ranger' was built in this yard in 1777 and the members of the crew were chiefly Kittery men. This was the ship, commanded by John Paul Jones and sent to France to carry word to the American commissioners that Burgoyne had surrendered, that received the first salute accorded a ship of the new Republic. Kittery yards also built the 'Kearsarge,' whose fight with the 'Alabama' was an important naval event during the Civil War.

At 0.5 m. (R) is a good view of the Navy Yard buildings. The highway proceeds between rows of beautiful, well-kept old homes.

The Lady Pepperell House (privak), 2.1 m. (R), was built between 1760 and 1765 for the widow of Sir William Pepperell, soldier-merchant (see below). Lady Pepperell, born Marjory Bray, lived here till her death in 1789, always using her former title in spite of the Revolution that destroyed it, and demanding the deference to which she felt it entitled her. The house, an elaborate two-story structure of Georgian design with a hip roof and four large chimneys, is said to have been built by two skilled English carpenters. The ell in the rear is of later construction. The main façade is heavy and lacking in refinement, in spite of the corner quoins and the pedimented central pavilion, which is flanked by two pedestaled Ionic pilasters, whose richly carved caps carry a bellied fringe and cornice uniting them with the modillioned main cornice. The most interesting

-249-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Maine, a Guide down East
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 483

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.