Maine, a Guide down East

By Workers of the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Maine | Go to book overview

stream through a rocky gorge. In early lumbering days the village was an important place; logs were sorted here and sent to Bangor in a segregated drive. The settlement is now small and scattered, the remaining inhabitants being employed at East Millinocket and Millinocket (seeTour 7).

Here is a junction with State 157 (seeTour 7).

At the northern end of MATTAWAMKEAG (alt. 212, Mattawamkeag Town, pop. 461) (seeTour 4), 138 m., is a junction with US 2 (see Tour 4).


TOUR 7: From MEDWAY to GREENVILLE, 95 m., State 157 and unnumbered road.

Via Millinocket, Katahdin State Game Preserve, Sourdnahunk Depot Camp, Ripogenus Dam, Kokadjo, and Lily Bay.

Road partly macadamized, partly graveled. Narrow woods road in middle section not recommended in wet weather. Private road with gates (open 6-6) between Sourdnahunk and Ripogenus Dam; permit from Great Northern Paper Company required at Bangor to cross dam.

Accommodations scarce; telephones for fire service only; 50 miles between gas pumps.

THIS route runs through several paper-making towns, and as a mere lane penetrates the heart of Maine's great North Woods, traversing 100 miles of unbroken forest with little sign of human habitation. It crosses the Katahdin State Game Preserve, above which looms Mount Katahdin, Maine's highest peak, crosses Ripogenus Dam, and skirts the southeastern shores of Moosehead Lake.

MEDWAY (alt. 280, Medway Town, pop. 406) (seeTour 6), 0 m., is at a junction with State 11 (seeTour 6).

At EAST MILLINOCKET (alt. 340, East Millinocket Town, pop. 1593), 2.6 m., the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. The community grew up rapidly in 1907, when the dam and mill of the Great Northern Paper Company were completed. The economic existence of the population, about half of which is French-Canadian, depends upon the paper mill.

MILLINOCKET (alt. 359, Millinocket Town, pop. 5830), 12.3 m., the easternmost settlement of importance on the route, became a boom town in 1899-1900 with the building of the Great Northern Paper Company Newsprint Plant, which has become one of the largest mills of its kind in the United States. It produces 620 tons of newsprint paper and 25 tons of

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