Maine, a Guide down East

By Workers of the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Maine | Go to book overview

Around 1843, a large group of Adventists, who were convinced the world was about to come to an end, gathered here. One ardent member turned loose his pigs and cattle and, with a few followers, went up to the top of near-by Haystack Mountain to await the cataclysm, only to return, disgruntled and sorely disappointed, to the task of collecting his scattered livestock.

More than a century ago Liberty was the home of Timothy Barrett, who, finding the village little to his liking, crossed to the opposite shore of George's Stream, where he laboriously, dug a cave for his dwelling and built a floating garden of logs upon which he raised vegetables. He had few confidants, and his seemingly inexhaustible supply of money gave rise to rumors that Barrett was a former buccaneer, possibly a fugitive from Great Britain. After his death, kettles containing French coins were dug up near his home and the hollow rail of a near-by, fence yielded $100 in gold coins.

Lovely St. George Lake, near-by, provides excellent fishing.

At 23.1 m. lies Sheepscot Pond.

When snow covers the green slopes, glistening against the background of pines, little red flags flutter on the icy surface of the pond heralding the arrival of the trap-fishing season. Spring traps, placed in holes cut through the ice, are attached to short wooden sticks with a tiny two-or- three-inch square bit of red cloth at the top. When the hungry fish rise to the bait, the spring snaps and the bright little flag bobs up to signal the bite. The fishermen are able to control several lines at one time. This manner of winter fishing is popular not only in this district but throughout the State.

PALERMO (alt. 345, Palermo Town, pop. 513), 26.9 m., settled in 1778 by pioneers from New Hampshire, is principally an agricultural community.

SOUTH CHINA (alt. 209, China Town) (seeTour13), 32 m., is at the junction with State 9 (seeTour 13).


TOUR 17: From AUGUSTA to ROCKLAND, 45.7 m., State 17.

Via South Windsor, Union, and West Rockport.

Two-lane tar-surfaced roads.

STATE 17 passes through peaceful agricultural country with gently rolling hills and skirts numerous small lakes and ponds.

AUGUSTA (alt. 120, pop. 17,198) (seeAUGUSTA), 0 m., is at the

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