Maine, a Guide down East

By Workers of the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Maine | Go to book overview

best for salmon, but this pool is a good place to try out some streamer flies such as black ghost, plumed knight, or welsh rabbit. Trout here have a special liking for smaller-sized flies.

Many good trout, salmon, and 'lakers' are taken from the pools just off the mouth of the Kennebec by flies, and in deep trolling from a boat.

Reached from Greenville, either by steamer, canoe, motor, or hiking, are such good trout grounds as Attean, Parlin, Rainbow, and Onawa Lakes. The streams in the vicinity are well stocked with trout (redspots or squaretail), which range from the six-incher up to four pounds. They bite worms readily, take trolling baits like the salmon, and rise readily to the fly. When hooked, they do not leap from the water as frequently as salmon.


SALT - WATER FISHING

IN THE salt water off the Maine coast, rock cod, cunners, and summer flounders or plaice are caught from the rocks along the shore; while in deeper waters are found bluefish, Atlantic salmon, mackerel, cod, cusk, herring, flounders, haddock, silver hake, chicken halibut, perch, pollock, sea bass, tuna, bluefins (small tuna), swordfish, porpoise, mackerel sharks, shad, alewives, and smelts. Of non-edible fish, sculpins and skates are all too frequently found on the fisherman's hook.

From Kittery to Belfast, offshore salt-water trolling with heavy rods and reels for the giant tuna or 'horse mackerel,' weighing up to 1000 pounds, is becoming a popular sport. They are terrific fighters, equal to those found off Block Island or in California waters. Tuna fishing is a rather expensive sport, requiring specially constructed rods and reels and boats equipped with special rigging.

Deep-sea fishing is an old and popular pastime on the Maine coast. Nearly every fishing village has its skipper who specializes in taking parties out to good fishing grounds, furnishing lines, hooks, and bait, and providing a real down-East meal of fish chowder at noon. The catch on these trips usually includes haddock, cod, cusk, hake, halibut, and perhaps swordfish in season.

A new sport, not usually known elsewhere on the Atlantic coast, is fly fishing for mackerel. The striped sea bass, a game fish weighing up to 20 pounds or more, is taken close to shore with surf-fishing tackle and in rivers that empty into the ocean.

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