Maine, a Guide down East

By Workers of the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Maine | Go to book overview

The resorts farther east also have their fleets of one-design boats. At Bar Harbor and Northeast Harbor, the yachts are fewer in number but larger in size than in the Penobscot region and on the lower coast. Boats of the 'Bull's Eye' class are especially prominent in the Bar Harbor region.

The principal yachting event of the year in Maine is the annual Monhegan Island race, staged by the Portland Yacht Club. This attracts entries from as far south as Marblehead, Mass., and from all sections of the Maine coast. The boats race over a 100-mile course from Portland Head to Cape Porpoise, thence to Monhegan Island and back to Portland, usually finishing within 30 hours under favorable weather conditions.

Small regattas and regularly scheduled races are held on some of the larger lakes, particularly at Sebago and Moosehead, although in general motor boating is a more popular sport on fresh water.


WINTER SPORTS

FOR nearly a century ice skating, tobogganing, fishing through the ice, and harness racing on ice have been the chief winter sports in Maine. More recently, ice hockey has been developed from the original game played by the American Indians on dry land, and many teams representing Maine's schools, colleges, and private athletic organizations compete with each other and with groups from other States and from Canada in this brilliant, fast-moving sport. Yet not until the past few years has Maine become aware of the unusual facilities for winter sports available in various parts of the State. The leading colleges and schools, of course, have for many years presented programs of winter sports, but these activities are limited locally and only few persons are able to compete in them. But now most of the leading cities and towns -- Lewiston, Bath, Augusta, Waterville, Bangor, Rumford, Camden, Fryeburg, North Berwick, Bar Harbor, Houlton, and Presque Isle -- have their ski trails and jumps, toboggan runs, snowshoe trails, and skating rinks; and a winter carnival, with an ice palace and a carnival queen, is held in each of these communities. The more ambitious of the carnivals have horse and iceboat racing, even dog-sled competitions. There are always breathtaking exhibitions of skill on skates or skis, but there is a generally prevailing spirit of good-natured competition rather than the more bitter partisanship of strenuous athletic contests.

Maine's topography -- rolling mountain slopes and high hills -- the consistency of its snows, warm sunshine, good transportation, and the

-438-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Maine, a Guide down East
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 483

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.