Image and Symbol in the Sacred Poetry of Richard Crashaw

By George Walton Williams | Go to book overview

II.
QUANTITY

THE CONCEPT of quantity is basic to Crashaw's poetry. It underlies in one way or another poems early and late, and it constitutes for Crashaw perhaps the readiest method of praise. The most conspicuous -- and most baroque -- aspect of quantity is abundance; God's plenty is found in the poetry, as in Nature, everywhere. But God is to be admired not only in extension but in contraction also; Crashaw discovers infinite riches in little rooms. His baroque spirit sets up highly restricted limits and confines and then bursts through them magnificently.1 God's abundant majesty in greatness and smallness ought to be praised, but man should consider his significance in comparison with that majesty. God's abundance, God's infinitesimalness, and man's insignificance are the three symbolic approaches by which Crashaw attempts to express the quantities of God.


1. Abundance

Some of the most striking symbols in Crashaw's poetry represent the abundance and supreme generosity of God. The source of these symbols lies in the primordiurn of the Judaeo-Christian cosmogony. God fulfills Himself most completely in His creative giving throughout the Bible; but this is evidenced first in Genesis in the creation of the world. The generosity of the creative gift effects the astonishing copiousness and complexity of the liber creaturarum. The abundance of this creation is paralleled by an abundance of destruction. The Noachic Deluge ( Genesis 7) offers a second example of the amplitude of God's power and majesty. But the abundance bears a symbolic interpretation even here. For the flood is, like the fortunate fall, a paradoxical opportunity for the Divine Being to show His grace through the death of the corrupt members of the race and the election of a single family to preservation on earth. Both the creation and the flood are more than simple functions of abundance; they are also indications of good and grace. The unlimited variety and number of created beings and the over-

____________________
1
Sypher, Four Stages of Renaissance Style, pp. 184, 212.

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Image and Symbol in the Sacred Poetry of Richard Crashaw
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - The Poet-Saint and the Baroque 1
  • II - Quantity 12
  • III - White and Red 33
  • IV - Light and Dark 57
  • V - Liquidity 84
  • VI - Other Symbols and Images 105
  • Bibliography 137
  • Indices 146
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 151

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.