Image and Symbol in the Sacred Poetry of Richard Crashaw

By George Walton Williams | Go to book overview

IV.
LIGHT AND DARK

THE SOURCE of the second color contrast in Crashaw is the Bible. God manifests the distinction between light and dark, like the concept of abundance, in the opening verses of Genesis. The Judaeo-Christian tradition will trace its emphasis on this opposition back to these verses, though the idea is fundamental and exists in pre-Hebraic and pagan cultures.1 Dionysius the Areopagite, devotes several ecstatic chapters of the Divine Names to the description of of the actions and characteristics of God as Light. As a commentary on the symbolism of light in Crashaw his remarks are valuable.

Let us then now celebrate the spiritual Name of Light, on the ground that He that fills every supercelestial mind with spiritual light, and expels all ignorance and error from all souls in which they may be, and imparts to them all sacred light, and cleanses their mental vision from the mist which envelops them, from ignorance, and stirs up and unfolds those enclosed by the great weight of darkness, and imparts, at first, a measured radiance; then, whilst they taste, as it were, the light, and desire it more, more fully gives Itself, and more abundantly enlightens them, because "they have loved much," and ever elevates them to things in advance, as befits the analogy of each for aspiration.

The Good then above every light is called spiritual Light, as fontal ray, and stream of light welling over, shining upon every mind, above, around, and in the world, from its fulness, and renewing their whole mental powers, and embracing them all by its over-shadowing; and being above all by its exaltations; and in one word, by embracing and having previously and preeminently the whole sovereignty of the light-dispensing faculty, as being source of light and above all light, and by comprehending in itself

____________________
1
Warren, Richard Crashaw, p. 178. See also Harry Levin, The Power of Blackness ( New York, 1958), pp. 29-31, and Francis B. Gummere, "On the Symbolic Use of the Colors Black and White in Germanic Tradition," Haverford College Studies, I, ( 1889), 112-162.

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Image and Symbol in the Sacred Poetry of Richard Crashaw
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - The Poet-Saint and the Baroque 1
  • II - Quantity 12
  • III - White and Red 33
  • IV - Light and Dark 57
  • V - Liquidity 84
  • VI - Other Symbols and Images 105
  • Bibliography 137
  • Indices 146
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 151

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.