Britain Divided: The Effect of the Spanish Civil War on British Political Opinion

By K. W. Watkins | Go to book overview

Appendix B

Translation of the manuscript prepared by Goicoechea as a record of the offers made by Mussolini on 31 March 1934

We, the undersigned: Lieut.-General Emilio Barrera, in his personal capacity; Don Rafael Olazabal and Senor Lizarra, on behalf of the 'Comunión Tradicionalista', and Don Antonio Goicoechea, as leader of the Party of 'Renovación Española', have drawn up this document so that there may remain on record what happened in the interview which they had at four o'clock this afternoon, March 31 1934, with the head of the Italian Government, Signor Mussolini, together with Marshal Italo Balbo. The President, after carefully informing himself from the answers, which each of those present gave to his questions, of the present situation of Spanish politics, and the aspirations and state of the Army and the Navy, and the Monarchist parties, declared the following to those there assembled: --
That he was ready to help with the necessary measures of assistance the two parties in opposition to the régime obtaining in Spain, in the task of overthrowing it and substituting it by a Regency which would prepare the complete restoration of the Monarchy; this declaration was solemnly repeated by Signor Mussolini three times, and those assembled received it with the natural manifestations of esteem and gratitude;
That as a practical demonstration and as a proof of his intentions he was ready to supply them immediately with 20,000 rifles; 20,000 hand-grenades; 200 machine-guns; and 1,500,000 pesetas in cash;
That such help was merely of an initial nature and would be opportunely completed with greater measures, accordingly as the work achieved justified this and circumstances made it necessary.

Those present agreed that for the handing over of the sum previously referred to, a delegate of the parties should be chosen, Se -- or Don Rafael Olazabal, and he should take charge of these funds and place them in Spain at the joint disposal of the two leaders, Conde de Rodezno and Antonio Goicoechea, for its distribution [ here there is a word which is illegible ] between the two, in the form and at the time and in the conditions on which they may decide.

In the same way it was agreed that with regard to the distribution of the first quantity of arms, the leaders in question should have what was necessary for the part proportional to the charge undertaken by each group and also for its transport to Spain. Rome, March 31, 1934.

Underneath the date there are some words repeating others already given, for the sake of clarification.

-245-

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Britain Divided: The Effect of the Spanish Civil War on British Political Opinion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - British Interests and the Spanish Civil War 1
  • 2 - Image and Reality 13
  • 3 - Non-Intervention 71
  • 4 - The British Right 83
  • 5 - The British Left 141
  • 6 - Spain and the Second World War 196
  • 7 - 'Conflicts -- Resolved and Unresolved' 202
  • Conclusion 234
  • Postscript 237
  • Appendix A 239
  • Appendix B 245
  • Appendix C 246
  • Appendix D 248
  • Appendix E 249
  • Appendix F 252
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 262
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