Acknowledgments

With tests of aptitude and achievement exerting ever greater influence on our lives, people are becoming increasingly uneasy. But their skepticism is held in check by their awe of the professionalism of the testers. The purpose of this book is to dispel that awe by subjecting the testers to public examination. In doing so it can hardly avoid being outspoken. My first thanks go, therefore, to those organizations and their representatives that readily gave me permission to quote sample questions and other material though they knew that my purpose was not flattery: the College Entrance Examination Board, the Educational Testing Service, Harcourt Brace & World, the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, and Science Research Associates.

My thanks go, too, to The American Scholar, Harper's Magazine, and Physics Today, in which articles of mine appeared from which I here quote.

I am grateful to the many people who have given me permission to quote from their letters and their publications, and to those who read the manuscript in whole or in part and made valuable suggestions. To those colleagues and students whom I have pestered over the years with sample multiple-choice questions and intricate questions about these questions I offer both my apologies and my thanks. And I know no way to express the depth of my gratitude to Jacques Barzun and Konrad Gries for their crucial advice and constant encouragement, not only while I was writing this book but also during the unfolding of the events that led to its being written.

BANESH HOFFMANN

Flushing, New York June 1962

-5-

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