Formosa: A Problem for United States Foreign Policy

By Joseph W. Ballantine | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3. Formosa Under Japanese Rule

ON MARCH 26, 1895, in the course of the Sino-Japanese war, the Japanese captured the Pescadores after a brief and ineffectual resistance by the Chinese. On April 1 a three weeks' armistice was agreed to, in which, at the instance of the Japanese, Formosa was not included, and peace negotiations were entered into at Shimonoseki. Three days before the expiry of the armistice, a peace treaty was signed, and on May 8 this treaty was ratified by both governments. The treaty provided for the cession to Japan of Formosa and of the Pescadores, though the Chinese diplomats tried in vain to soften Japanese insistence on these provisions.


Pacification of the Island

Local Chinese officials and other leaders in Formosa were not reconciled to the action of the Imperial Chinese Government, and they sent a deputation to Peking to present a memorial opposing the cession. Overtly at least, the deputation received no satisfaction, but there are indications that the secret encouragement and support that it received from officials on the mainland were in part responsible for the memorial sent on May 23 to the Emperor at Peking by the Formosan literati, reading as follows: "The literati and people of Formosa are de-

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