Long Time Coming: Racial Inequality in the Nonmetropolitan South, 1940-1990

By Mark A. Fossett; M. Therese Seibert | Go to book overview

Summary

We reviewed many different trends in this chapter. Out of all of these, one set of trends is to be emphasized above all others; declines in racial inequality in occupational attainment have not been dramatic and indeed the typical level of inequality observed in the counties in our sample was not much lower in 1990 than it had been in 1940 and 1950. Between 1940 and 1960 racial inequality in nonmetropolitan counties actually trended up and peaked in 1960. Since then it has gradually drifted down. This downward movement has been modest, however, and inequality today remains high. Indeed, it is in fact only about one-quarter to one-third off the peak values seen in 1960. We now turn in the next two chapters to the results of multivariate analyses which try to assess what factors are responsible for declines in inequality and what factors contribute to its persistence.


Notes
1.
Unless otherwise noted, any reference to the "typical" county refers to the county with the median value in the distribution being described. We prefer the median over the mean (which we also report) as a summary measure of central tendency because it is less easily distorted by one or two unusual values. Similarly, we report the interdecile range (IDR) as well as the standard deviation (SD) to summarize dispersion because the interdecile range is less sensitive to extreme cases. When a variable is normally distributed, its interdecile range is about 2.5 times its standard deviation.
2.
This measure is discussed in more detail in Appendix A. Substantively, scores above 10 indicate modest inequality favoring Whites, scores above 30 indicate substantial inequality, and scores above 50 indicate extensive inequality.
3.
In 1950 family income data for Blacks include "unrelated individuals". In order to make an "apple's-to-apples" comparison we also use income data for families and unrelated individuals for Whites. In later decades, the comparisons are based on income distributions for White families and Black families.
4.
The occupation data for 1940, 1950, 1960, and 1970 are taken from published census volumes. The data for 1980 and 1990 are taken from detailed machine readable census files. The broad occupation categories used in published tabulations in 1980 and 1990 differ substantially from those used in previous censuses. To overcome this problem, we drew on detailed data and prepared tabulations for 1980 and 1990 which used major category groupings similar to those used in earlier censuses. To do this we processed the detailed occupation data for 1980 and 1990 and allocated them into 1970-equivalent categories using an allocation tables developed by Kubitschek ( 1986) for 1980 and the U.S. Bureau of the Census ( 1989) for

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Long Time Coming: Racial Inequality in the Nonmetropolitan South, 1940-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures xi
  • Preface xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 16
  • 2 - Determinants of Racial Inequality in Nonmetropolitan Areas 18
  • Notes 70
  • 3 - Measurement Issues 76
  • Notes 89
  • 4 - Trends in Inequality 91
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Cross-Sectional Analyses 129
  • Notes 156
  • 6 - Longitudinal Analyses 159
  • Notes 185
  • 7 - Overview and Discussion 187
  • Appendix A - Measuring Inequality 195
  • Notes 224
  • Appendix B - Measuring Inequality with Census Occupation Data 229
  • Notes 246
  • Appendix C - Measures 248
  • Notes 258
  • References 261
  • Index 273
  • About the Book and Authors 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 285

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.