Long Time Coming: Racial Inequality in the Nonmetropolitan South, 1940-1990

By Mark A. Fossett; M. Therese Seibert | Go to book overview

was near the mid-point of our observation period. This choice is not particularly important as the results were similar when other decades were adopted as the standard.


Notes
1.
They do not directly incorporate fringe benefits, job security, or quality of working conditions, but these aspects of occupations correlate closely with income and education ( Jencks, Perman, and Rainwater 1988).
2.
For example, the mean status score for the broad category "crafts workers" was based on the average of the separate status scores for all detailed occupations within this broad category weighted to reflect their proportionate share of the total number of persons employed in the crafts category.
3.
The earlier and more detailed version of this paper appendix tables is available from the University of Texas Population Research Center Working Paper Series for a nominal fee and includes a machine-readable version of the appendix tables on computer diskette (in IBM-PC format). Address inquiries to Population Research Center, 1800 Main Building, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 or phone (512) 471-5514.
4.
We also considered ranking occupations on the basis of mean years of schooling completed, percentages of high school graduates, percentages of college graduates, and distributional comparisons against the educational distribution for the employed labor force using Lieberson's index of net difference ( Lieberson 1975). We found the resulting rankings to be quite similar and decided to rank on the basis of median education to maintain comparability with prior research. We also conducted similar experiments with alternative methods of ranking occupations on income with obtained similar results.
5.
Education and income data used to compute the scores for 1950 were taken from Tables 10 and 19 of the 1950 census subject report on occupational characteristics ( US Bureau of the Census 1956). The separate tabulations for men and women were combined to yield education and income distributions for the total civilian labor force. Education and income data used to compute the scores for 1960 were taken from Tables 9 and 25 of the 1960 census report on occupational characteristics ( US Bureau of the Census 1963). As with data for 1950, education and income distributions for the total civilian labor force were obtained by combining the separate distributions for men and women. Education and income data used to compute the scores for 1980 were taken from tabulations created using the Public Use Micro Samples of the 1980 Census ( US Bureau of the Census 1983).
6.
We explored the possibility of using the 1940 PUMS files to prepare the necessary tabulations, but found this was not possible due to severe problems with the measurement of income in 1940.
7.
Occupations were matched based on Table 125 of the 1950 Census of

-258-

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Long Time Coming: Racial Inequality in the Nonmetropolitan South, 1940-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures xi
  • Preface xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 16
  • 2 - Determinants of Racial Inequality in Nonmetropolitan Areas 18
  • Notes 70
  • 3 - Measurement Issues 76
  • Notes 89
  • 4 - Trends in Inequality 91
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Cross-Sectional Analyses 129
  • Notes 156
  • 6 - Longitudinal Analyses 159
  • Notes 185
  • 7 - Overview and Discussion 187
  • Appendix A - Measuring Inequality 195
  • Notes 224
  • Appendix B - Measuring Inequality with Census Occupation Data 229
  • Notes 246
  • Appendix C - Measures 248
  • Notes 258
  • References 261
  • Index 273
  • About the Book and Authors 285
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