Virginians on Olympus: A Cultural Analysis of Four Great Men

By Marshall William Fishwick | Go to book overview

Foreword

VIRGINIA: a state some have lavishly praised and others have bitterly denounced, when neither attitude was completely justified by actuality; a land much loved, long abused, and often misunderstood; an area in which extremes flourish more readily than means, and in which the past is not allowed to die.

Virginia: that "symbol for romance throughout the world of English speech," according to Alfred North Whitehead; that Commonwealth which "looks forward in a consciousness of her responsibility to justify her past," according to Douglas Southall Freeman; that cultural unit which provides the visitor with an experience "almost as definite as to cross the English Channel," according to T. S. Eliot.

Many of the Old Dominion's citizens are irrationally proud of their birthright, and completely in accordance with John Esten Cooke's claim that "Virginians have objected in all times to being rubbed down to a uniformity with the rest of the world." But they seldom stop to analyze or document this assumed uniqueness. These essays attempt to scrutinize closely one aspect of the Virginia mind -- its tendency towards hero worship -- and answer such questions as these: how and why have Virginians chosen four men as their leading heroes? How have they preserved their memory and exonerated them from attack? What qualities do the heroes have in common?

To the Rockefeller Foundation, for a summer grant which enabled me to study aspects of hero worship in America, and to the Virginia Historical Society, for permission to use this material which first appeared in the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, I am deeply indebted.

MARSHALL W. FISHWICK

Washington and Lee University February, 1951

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Virginians on Olympus: A Cultural Analysis of Four Great Men
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 74

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.