V
Interlude

THE year 1880 opened auspiciously for H. C. Frick & Co. Orders were plentiful and business was brisk; wages were satisfactory to the miners and profits were equally gratifying to the firm; the little village of Broadford resounded from daylight to dusk with the clanking of freight cars fetching building materials and carrying to market every ton of precious coke that could be produced; the whole country round, so recently sleepy and despondent, was stirred by unceasing activities of farmers and tradesmen; and, best of all, not a cloud could be discerned upon the sky of widening prosperity.

Free now for the first time from financial exigencies and strengthened in both resources and confidence by his partnership, the head of the firm concentrated his energies upon the art of organization whose mastery was destined to constitute the basis of his subsequent achievements. He had little to go upon. The potency of this mighty force, except in military undertakings and to a limited extent in railway operation, had never been recognized in commercial affairs although for centuries it had been fully appreciated by the Church of Rome. Great industries had flourished abroad, notably in England, but rather as segregated units profiting from arduous

-67-

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Henry Clay Frick, the Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Henry Clay Frick the Man 1
  • II - Boyhood 12
  • III - Beginning Business in Coke 29
  • IV - A Triumph of Faith and Courage 44
  • V - Interlude 67
  • VI - Enter the Carnegies, 76
  • VII - "The Man" in Steel 93
  • VIII - Homestead 106
  • IX - The State Intervenes 124
  • X - Attempted Assassination 136
  • XI - Politics 146
  • XII - "The Laird" and "The Man" 160
  • XIII - Victory's Cost and Gain 175
  • XIV - Oliver and Frick 187
  • XV - Negotiations 200
  • XVI - Mr. Frick Receives His Resignationvisory Committee 218
  • XVII - The Final Dramatic Break 227
  • XVIII - Mr. Frick Wins His Fight 237
  • XIX - The United States Steel Corporation 258
  • XX - A Capitalist 269
  • XXI - Public Affairs 289
  • XXII - The Patriot 313
  • XXIII - An Art Collector 331
  • XXIV - Benefactions and Bequests 344
  • XXV - Personality 356
  • Index 377
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