IX
The State Intervenes

THE morning of July 7th dawned upon a wholly peaceful community, with the Advisory Committee of the Amalgamated Association in absolute possession of the properties owned by the Carnegie Steel Company and in full military control of the town of Homestead with its ten thousand inhabitants and all the approaches by land and water to both. A state of siege was declared. Strangers were excluded, citizens were arrested without warrant, telegrams to newspapers and individuals were censored and reporters suspected of writing unfavorable accounts were kicked out hatless and coatless to grope their way through the darkness of night to Pittsburgh as best they could.

"Mob law," a special correspondent who had been thus treated telegraphed to the NEW YORK TIMES, "is absolute. Never were rioters better armed. Not only have they in their possession the guns captured from the three hundred Pinkertons, with all the ammunition belonging to that fateful expedition, but they have also been supplied with rifles by three independent military organizations of Pittsburgh, known as the Hibernian Rifles, and by a Polish gun club. Today they received a box of ammunition from Philadelphia, and yesterday one of the strikers informed a reporter that enough dynamite was

-124-

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Henry Clay Frick, the Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Henry Clay Frick the Man 1
  • II - Boyhood 12
  • III - Beginning Business in Coke 29
  • IV - A Triumph of Faith and Courage 44
  • V - Interlude 67
  • VI - Enter the Carnegies, 76
  • VII - "The Man" in Steel 93
  • VIII - Homestead 106
  • IX - The State Intervenes 124
  • X - Attempted Assassination 136
  • XI - Politics 146
  • XII - "The Laird" and "The Man" 160
  • XIII - Victory's Cost and Gain 175
  • XIV - Oliver and Frick 187
  • XV - Negotiations 200
  • XVI - Mr. Frick Receives His Resignationvisory Committee 218
  • XVII - The Final Dramatic Break 227
  • XVIII - Mr. Frick Wins His Fight 237
  • XIX - The United States Steel Corporation 258
  • XX - A Capitalist 269
  • XXI - Public Affairs 289
  • XXII - The Patriot 313
  • XXIII - An Art Collector 331
  • XXIV - Benefactions and Bequests 344
  • XXV - Personality 356
  • Index 377
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