Social Interaction, Social Context, and Language: Essays in Honor of Susan Ervin-Tripp

By Dan Isaac Slobin; Julie Gerhardt et al. | Go to book overview

(23-29, 35-42, 118-125) and five (77-90, 91-106, 107-117). The final sequence of five turns (126-138) has an extravagant three pairs within its fifth turn.

Scene [iii] of Act I is puzzling. The last five lines are a clear stanza, introduced by a change of topic and explicit address (72-76). The three pairs of turns at talk just before (64-71) have coherence, three questions answered with "OK," but do follow directly on what precedes. Perhaps what precedes is a five element stanza (55-63), but it seems more likely that 64-65 is a Janus-faced turn, counting doubly, implicitly at least, so that line 64 completes three pairs with 55-63.

Sometimes the initial group is more complex than others (17-20, 43-47, 48-50, [this might alternatively be three pairs], 77-81).

There is one more written story:
[4]
Once upon a time I was playing Atari
and my TV disappeared
so I told my mom
and my mom called the police
The policeman said
    he'd be over in a second.
5
So he rang the bell
and he came in
and said he might know
    where everything is going.
10
so he caught the robber
and put him in Jail
the end.

Himley points out that this is summary, not narrative, and more typical of written language in having exposition, not dialogue (164). Even so, it is shaped as if it were oral. It has five parts. An introduction (1-2) and close (13) enclose three units, each marked with initial so (3-5, 6-10, 11-12).


REFERENCES

Dickinson, D., Wolf, M., & Stotsky, S. ( 1993). The interwoven development of oral and written language. In J. B. Gleason (Ed.), The development of language ( 3rd ed., pp. 369-420). New York: Macmillan.

Gee, J. P. ( 1989). Literacy, discourse, and linguistics. Essays by James Paul Gee. Special issue of Journal of Education, 171, 1.

Gee, J. P. ( 1991). A linguistic approach to narrative. Journal of Narrative and Life History; 1, 15-40.

Gee, J. P. ( 1992). The social mind. Language, ideology, and social practice. New York: Bergin & Garvey.

Himley, M. ( 1991). Shared territory: Understanding children's writing as works. New York: Oxford University Press.

Hymes, D. ( 1991a). Is poetics original and functional? Language and Communication, 11(½), 49-51.

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Interaction, Social Context, and Language: Essays in Honor of Susan Ervin-Tripp
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 655

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.