Social Interaction, Social Context, and Language: Essays in Honor of Susan Ervin-Tripp

By Dan Isaac Slobin; Julie Gerhardt et al. | Go to book overview

operations, and eventually into fully integrated conceptually-driven representations. In the case in point, use of the morpheme ve at each phase of development is based on a given level of knowledge, which will subsequently be extended and reorganized, at different periods in children's development: at first, in question-and-answer interchanges, where each child-turn provides only a single comment on the same topic; then in short two to three-clause narratives that are embedded in heavily scaffolded ongoing conversational interaction; only later in the more complex cognitive task of producing lengthier and textually elaborate narratives in noninteractive discourse setting. These findings also accord with Slobin's ( 1994) analysis of the development of perfect aspect in different languages, as proceeding from a directly referential function to inferences from nonvisible situations, and from there to "textual" meanings. Language development is thus seen to evolve from an immature pragmatic basis, which is communicatively and interaction-driven -- telling the hearer more is to come; it proceeds to a semantically appropriate, propositionally-based use of syntactic constructions -- conjoining sequentially related events; and it culminates in a discourse-motivated, global organization of speech output -- selective use of elision, conjoining, and embedding in constructing a thematically integrated extended text.


REFERENCES

Aksu-Ko, ç A., & von C. Stutterheim( 1994). "Temporal relations in narrative: Simultaneity." In R. A. Berman & D. I. Slobin. Different ways of relating events in narrative: A crosslinguistic developmental study (pp. 393-455). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Ardery, G. ( 1979). "The development of coordination in child language". Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 18, 745-756.

Bamberg, M. ( 1994). "Development of linguistic forms: German". In R. A. Berman & D. I. Slobin ( 1994). Different ways of relating events in narrative: A crosslinguistic developmental study. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Bates, E., & MacWhinney, B. ( 1982). "Functionalist approaches to grammar". In E. Wanner & L. Gleitman (Eds.), Language acquisition: The state of the art (pp. 173-218). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Berman, R. A. ( 1979). "Form and function: Passives, middles, and impersonal in modern Hebrew". Berkeley Linguistic Society, 5, 1-27.

Berman, R. A. ( 1986). "A step-by-step model of language development". In I. Levin (Ed.), Stage and structure: Reopening the debate (pp. 191-219). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Berman, R. A. ( 1988). "On the ability to relate events in narrative". Discourse Processes, 11, 469-497.

Berman, R. A. ( 1990). "Acquiring an (S)VO language: Subjectless sentences in children's Hebrew." Linguistics, 28, 1135-1166.

Berman, R. A. ( 1993a). "Crosslinguistic perspectives on native language acquisition". In K. Hyltenstam & A. Viberg (Eds.), Progression and Regression in Language (pp. 245-266). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

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