Social Interaction, Social Context, and Language: Essays in Honor of Susan Ervin-Tripp

By Dan Isaac Slobin; Julie Gerhardt et al. | Go to book overview

girls were more likely to use self-directed humor to facilitate discussion of personal experiences, whereas fifth-grade boys, like college-age men, were more likely to use it to minimize the importance of a self-revelation or to divert attention away from an uncomfortable topic. In short, we found older girls and women to use self-directed humor to increase, and conversely, older boys and men to use self-directed humor to decrease interpersonal vulnerability.

To date, we have by no means completed our work on gender differences in conversational humor, and there are still a number of issues involving ethnicity and development that we set out to explore, but as of yet have not been able to address fully. However, what we have accomplished so far is to set an agenda for the study of a wide range of phenomena involving conversational humor, which we hope to address further and invite others to follow.


REFERENCES

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Alberts, J. K. ( 1992). "An inferential/strategic explanation for the social organization of teases". Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 11,153-177.

Apte, M. ( 1985). Humor and Laughter: An anthropological approach. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Aries, E. ( 1976). "Interaction patterns and themes of male, female, and mixed groups". Small Group Behavior, 7, 7-18.

Carter, J. ( 1989). Stand-up comedy: The book. New York: Dell.

Chapman, A. J., & Gadfield, N. J. ( 1976). "Is sexual humor sexist?" Journal of Communication, 26,141- 153.

Chow, E. ( 1987). "The development of feminist consciousness among Asian American women". Gender & Society, 1,284-299.

Coser, R. ( 1959). "Some social functions of laughter". Human Relations, 12,171-182.

Coser, R. ( 1960). "Laughter among colleagues". Psychiatry, 23,81-95.

Crawford, M., & Gressley, D. ( 1991). "Creativity, caring, and context: Women's and men's accounts of humor preferences and practices". Psychology of Women Quarterly, 15,217-231.

Damon, W., & Hart, D. ( 1988). Self-understanding in childhood and adolescence. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Derks, P. ( 1992). "Category and ratio scaling of sexual and innocent cartoons". Humor International Journal of Humor Research, 5,319-329

Eder, D. ( 1993) Go get ya a French!": Romantic and sexual teasing among adolescent girls. In D. Tannen (Ed.), Gender and conversational interaction (pp. 17-31). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ervin-Tripp, S. M., & Lampert, M. ( 1992). "Gender differences in the construction of humorous talk". In K. Hall, M. Buchholtz, & B. Moonwoman (Eds.), Locating power: Proceedings of the Second Berkeley Women and Language Conference (pp. 108-117). Berkeley: Berkeley Women and Language Group, University of California.

Ervin-Tripp, S. M., & Lampert, M. D. ( 1993, March). Laughter through the ages: Developmental trends in children's conversational humor. Paper presented at the 1993 biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, New Orleans, LA.

Ervin-Tripp, S. M., Lampert, M. D., Scales, B., & Sprott, R. ( 1990, April). "The humor of preschool boys and girls in naturalistic settings". In Lampert M. D. (Chair), Developmental Perspectives onHumor Production and Appreciation

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